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[teacherartexchange] Stacie's African Art Masks Lesson - link - resources update

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From: Deborah Kaye (kaye.deborah_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Aug 08 2005 - 07:22:34 PDT


Hi Group,

Stacie did send her lesson to Judy Decker....
Here is the link - I don't need to forward anymore:
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/Files/Stacie-Masks.htm

Stacie - I forwarded your lesson to 8 members now.

I have been working on my own adaptations of her lesson. I would also
place emphasis on Animal Spirit masks of West Africa (Dogon from Mali
and/or Bobo Bwa/Nuna from Burkina Faso) just because it is easy to
find dance resources on those cultures so students can experience the
whole work of art - costume/dance/music/mask. I love the Kuba masks
and had some very nice prints of various Kuba masks that I displayed,
but did not focus as much on that culture (I had a hard time
remembering the names of the masks - smile).

I came across all of these NEW resources from University of Iowa - Art
and Life of Africa project. Music - photos - video clips from Burkina
Faso. I love the animal spirit masks of the Bobo/Bwa and Nuna. See the
video trailers for dance and costume (DVD's available, but you can get
enough of an idea from the video clips online).

http://www.uiowa.edu/~africart/

New material on this site by Christopher Roy - Art of Burkina Faso -
Signs and Symbols in African Art and more. Photographs of Burkina
Faso....Listen to Bwa balas, flutes and drums....Nuna drums....
Streaming trailer videos of Nuna masks/dances.....Masks of Bwa Village
trailer (Art is a verb).... African Masks: Burkina Faso video clip.

For Dogon Culture - see African Art:Through the Eyes of Africa (video
available from Crystal Productions). Also see Togu Na and Cheko (Togu
Na is meeting house for the Dogon - also shows the Dama dance with
masks - Cheko is a harvest celebration of the Bamana and neighboring
cultures - good for showing colorful textiles, puppets and some
masks).

I think students could draw some nice comparisons/contrast with the
Northwest Coast masks, too.

I will be revising the lesson to use paper mache, cardboard tubes, and
corrugated cardboard as the hands on mask making lesson (all FREE
materials to me). I think I will limit colors to those paints I can
also get for free (miss-mixed paints from paint stores). Those will be
the colors for "our culture".... You will see that cultures from
Burkina Faso and Northwest coast had a limited color palette. Might
have to have some of the kids volunteer to bring in a roll of masking
tape or aluminum foil.

Deborah

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