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Re:[teacherartexchange] Autistic Art

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From: Terry Marney (terrylou63_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Aug 02 2005 - 13:46:11 PDT


Hi Peggy. I worked with special needs kids one
summer, kids with autism & down's syndrome. I got to
do a few art projects with them, but very limited. I
think BIG PAINTINGS would really appeal to them...big
brushes, big surfaces. Maybe finger-painting on a big
surface, too....unless they have tactile issues where
they can't stand to get their hands messy! In that
case, you could have other options like pushing the
paint around with different tools (sticks, Q-tips,
sponges, brushes) Working with clay would be another
good choice. A fun idea would be to have music
playing and have them paint to Beethoven....and then
paint to some fun Carribean Reggae...and see the
differences in their paintings. Hope this helps!
Terry

--- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, August 01,
> 2005.
>
> 1. Paint skin
> 2. African Art unit
> 3. Re: African Art Unit
> 4. African Art Unit - contemporary art twist
> 5. RE: African Art unit
> 6. African Unit
> 7. African Unit
> 8. Arican Unit
> 9. African Unit
> 10. African Unit
> 11. Back to school ideas
> 12. African unit
> 13. African unit
> 14. Re: Autistic Art Students
> 15. The Enderle Family Smoky Mountains trip
> 16. African Unit
> 17. African Unit
> 18. African Unit
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Paint skin
> From: Mikel Lee <mikellee31@yahoo.com>
> Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2005 05:53:50 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> I just read this article on Wetcanvas.com
>
> http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/62215/588
>
> and thought that it was very interesting because it
> mentioned using the paint skins for a mosaic
> material!
> This could be a really easy/ cheap alternative to
> tile
> and glass, etc. - Mikel
>
>
>
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>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: African Art unit
> From: "SIZANA" <atla@mweb.co.za>
> Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2005 16:15:58 +0200
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Hi All
>
> A question: why do we always get stuck on masks when
> we discuss African
> Art? Is this not just taking the easy way out? If
> you take the whole
> continent into consideration, the culture of masks
> is practiced in a
> relatively small portion. Mural art, body decoration
> (piercing, body
> painting) and personal adornment (jewelry) is much
> more widespread.
>
> Come to think of it, body art and the varying ideas
> of beauty could make
> for a very interesting lesson, especially if it is
> compared with modern
> Western ideas of beauty.
>
> Tracey in Durban, South Africa
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: African Art Unit
> From: Peri Raygor-Yanez <perigraphics@earthlink.net>
> Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2005 07:37:12 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Just some suggestions: One year I introduced tattoos
> as an art form.
> Using the encyclopedia I cut each of the sections
> out of copies and
> gave small groups one of the selection to present.
> We looked at types,
> cause and effect on the people who got them. This
> spread easily into a
> project on face painting for Halloween. I, a red
> haired white woman,
> used an African mask as a model to paint my face. I
> learned the mask I
> painted was a lion! Once on me, the lion came alive.
> I had to wear it
> to understand its power. It was an instant hit with
> my 9th graders.
> George the sculpture teacher, at the district arts
> magnet visited the
> Maori culture and suggested tattoo as art. Another
> friend, Janet
> Broyles interviewed an African American professor of
> art education at
> ASU on tape, then presented a Yoruban beaded tribal
> quilt, with each
> square created by individual students. It was
> stunning. They visited
> the Bead Museum in Glendale, AZ, who collaborated on
> the film. Have fun
> with your project.
>
> Peri
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: African Art Unit - contemporary art twist
> From: Deborah Kaye <kaye.deborah@gmail.com>
> Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2005 10:46:57 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Greetings Tracey and all,
>
> Tracey - you always get my wheels turning (grin).
> What about taking a
> contemporary art approach - that ties in mask making
> and body
> adornment? Could also reflect textile patterns.
>
> I really like the arm and face installation pieces
> by African American
> artist Ben Jones. The face and arm casts are painted
> with cultural
> patterns - in bright colors (and show influence of
> African Art).
>
> I can see how you could do this idea with middle
> school kids to create
> a temporary installation piece. Students would paint
> their face and
> arm cast with symbols and patterns that represent
> their cultural
> heritage - and use some of the characteristics of
> West African Art as
> well (geometric pattern, repetition, concentric
> shapes, exaggeration -
> etc). The painting can also reflect knowledge of
> Ndebele mural
> painting. I have ideas on this, too. This project
> would take at least
> three weeks to complete (as students need the
> introduction to
> cultures).
>
> If anyone is interested in hearing more about this
> project idea and
> wants images of Ben Jones work, email me off list. I
> also have an idea
> how to add Kathy's idea of "What I feel on the
> inside" and "who I am
> on the outside"
>
> Michael Gerrish has an arm cast - tattoo lesson
> online you can easily
> adapt to fit the Ben Jones idea (his lesson is easy
> to find).
>
> Deborah
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: African Art unit
> From: "KPRS2" <kprs2@earthlink.net>
> Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2005 12:23:20 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Also how about toys made from 'throwaways'. I bought
> this great chicken made
> out of recycled plastic bags that is African. See
> this site
>
>
http://www.ethnicarts.com/Miscellaneous/recycled_plastic_chickens_1.htm
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SIZANA [mailto:atla@mweb.co.za]
> Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 10:16 AM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] African Art unit
>
>
> Hi All
>
> A question: why do we always get stuck on masks when
> we discuss African
> Art? Is this not just taking the easy way out? If
> you take the whole
> continent into consideration, the culture of masks
> is practiced in a
>
=== message truncated ===

                
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