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Re: teaching pencil shading-m.s.

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From: Sidnie Miller (sidmill_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Aug 23 2003 - 18:08:35 PDT


I think one of the hardest things for kids is trying to see the shadows so
I think it's imperative that you set up some spotlights --set up some
objects and have the kids draw them and shade. A really successful set up
for me was the skulls and bones stuff--I had a bare bulb hanging from the
ceiling with extension cords hooked to the ceiling so noone would trip
over it in the semi dark. We drew the set up with the lights up--one
day--then went to the light bulb. We divided up the drawn page into 5
sections
in any manner and when they reached a new section they had to change
techniques. We had prefaced the assignment with practice sets of 7 value
steps each
using ebony pencil, charcoal, and pen and ink with pointilism, scribble
shading and cross-hatching. They could choose their 5 favorites.
The 8th graders liked the dark room and felt like it was "real art" and
their drawings were all pretty good since there are all kinds of skulls
and consequently their drawings looked like some kind of skull of
something. We touched them up with white chalk to increase the contrast
(oh, I forgot, we used gray bogus paper). This is kind of an old standard
assignment--not very exciting or original, but with low lights and a spot,
the kids can SEE- the VALUE PATTERNS!!. They really can't see subtle
differences yet. The different techniques make the drawings exciting, even
if the likenesses are bad. Many parents have these drawings framed at
home. Sid

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# Sidnie Miller #
# Elko High School #
# College Avenue #
# Elko, NV 89801 #
# 702-738-7281 #
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