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art textbooks.....

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From: Bunki Kramer (bkramer_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Aug 02 2001 - 17:07:35 PDT


from: Bunki Kramer (bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us)
Los Cerros Middle School
968 Blemer Road
Danville, CA 94526
art webpage - http://ww2.lcms.srvusd.k12.ca.us/faculty/faculty.html
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>From: Cindi Hiers <suwanneecrew@yahoo.com>
>(snip)...... Anyway, with my high
> schoolers I found using these texts nice but I could
> deliver most of the information orally without passing
> out books---does this make sense? Passing books out
> for such a short period of time seemed needless. I
> liked the books for terms. I have personal art
> history books I keep in the classroom for reference.
> Again, thanks for all your help! > Cindi Hiers
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Seems you've discovered what I have. There's no ONE BOOK that says it all so
why bother with a book? Personally I'd used all that lovely book $$$ to buy
more big prints for teaching aids, videos, etc. I found that I could
research better info on many things than relying on a limited source from
one book. Often books tend to eliminate women as artists and lean more
towards dead European white male artists...and FORGET local artists.
Also....large visuals provide a better, clearer view of what you want to
show than a little 2x3" picture. Making your own transparencies is easy and
you only have to use/make what you want to emphasize. I personally rely on
big visuals, examples, and my overhead to teach. There just isn't a
"perfect" book out there...not yet anyway. Toodles....Bunki

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