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Lesson Plans


meet beckman in st. louis

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
KATHY K (KATHALEEN_KERN)
Tue, 6 Apr 1999 10:41:29 -0700


hi all,
just came back from st. louis were they have beckman and paris special
show. it well worth attending if you are in the area. the museum itself is
wonderful architecture and has the largest collection of german
expressionism that i've experienced in one museum. i have not been a lover
of this style in the past, yet we often come to appreciate the work by
experiencing it. the show features beckman, picasso, matisse, leger, and
others. thanks st. louis, kathy

----------
> From: artsednet-digest <owner-artsednet-digest.edu>
> To: artsednet-digest.edu
> Subject: artsednet-digest V2 #1339
> Date: Tuesday, April 06, 1999 8:15 AM
>
>
> artsednet-digest Tuesday, April 6 1999 Volume 02 : Number
1339
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
> Re: misspelled word
> Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
> Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
> Another Walk Through Trajan's Forum
> RE: Take 5--Art and Mathematics
> Potter's Wheel Plans
> Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
> Re: collecting feathers
> Re: feathers
> RE: collecting feathers
> Re: heirsh core
> Re: hand printing
> Re; feathers
> digest vs. individual
> RE: collecting feathers
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 05 Apr 1999 23:23:55 -0400
> From: "river002" <river002>
> Subject: Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
>
> Sher, Since you've been doing all that preparation, you have the basis
> for a couple of great clay units! Two items come to mind: one, take
the
> plant drawings, transfer them to handmade tiles and adhere them
to
> plywood
> with mastic. This creates a wonderful frame around a window in the
> school. This was done very successfully in my school 2 years ago and
> still brings admiring comments. (Plus it leaves behind a little part
of
> those fifth graders!) Secondly, another success with fifth graders
and
> clay was to create dragonflies, lizards, caterpillars, etc. during a
> ecological study of creatures indigenous to our area. We glazed the
> creatures and placed them outside in an area near the Butterfly
> Garden. I'll be happy to share more details later if these
> ideas are generating any dendrites, right now it's late and I can't
believe
> I'm sitting here pounding away at the keyboard. Let me know......
>
> "...5th grade so far has been concentrating on values and still lifes and
> using values to make objects look real,,,,, plus they are using ezcut for
> relief
> printing; drawing plants from outside for the subject matter..."
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 05 Apr 1999 23:33:45 -0400
> From: "river002" <river002>
> Subject: Re: misspelled word
>
> "Here's some trivia I ran into, which you may or may not find of
interest.
> What is the most frequenly misspelled word used by teachers?"
>
>
>
> The third, definitely, has to be "caricature". :D
> [Pardon me, I couldn't resist]. Sandra.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 05 Apr 1999 22:54:37 -0500
> From: Melissa Chaney <meemo>
> Subject: Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
> - --------------B2A563B405666808C4F0DA49
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> Have you tried cookie jars or tea pots? My 2nd graders make frogs and
I've
> done bells and rattles. I know there is a lesson for clay whistles but
I've
> never tried it.
>
> Sher wrote:
>
> > Hi All! Im so jealous of all you who went to dc!!! how exciting it must
> > have been!!
> > I need some help and who better to ask than you guys!! I want to do a
> > different clay project this year with my 5th graders. In the past we
did
> > slab constrution containers and it could be anything their little minds
> > could think of but it had to be made from slabs and be a container...
> > well for some reason my 5th graders seem to loose their creativity and
I
> > would get cylinders and cubes!! some one did a cool triangular shoe
> > once! So Im trying to think up something fun... my kindergarteners
make
> > clay beads, 1st make aztec clay suns, 2nd (new this year) make japanese
> > tea cups, 3rd make pueblo coil clay pottery and 4th make gothic
> > gargoyles. my school is incorporating the heirsh core ..... 5th grade
> > so far has been concentrating on values and still lifes and using
values
> > to make objects look real,,,,, plus they are using ezcut for relief
> > printing; drawing plants from outside for the subject matter....soooooo
> > after all of that are there any ideas out there in cyber land!!!:)
> > thanks for your support, in advance:)
> >
> > sher
>
>
>
> - --------------B2A563B405666808C4F0DA49
> Content-Type: text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii; name="vcard.vcf"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> Content-Description: Card for Melissa Chaney
> Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="vcard.vcf"
>
> begin: vcard
> fn: Melissa Chaney
> n: Chaney;Melissa
> org: Ray-Pec Schools Peculiar, MO
> email;internet: meemo
> title: Shull 6th Grade Art
> x-mozilla-cpt: ;0
> x-mozilla-html: FALSE
> version: 2.1
> end: vcard
>
>
> - --------------B2A563B405666808C4F0DA49--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 05 Apr 1999 22:58:30 -0500
> From: Melissa Chaney <meemo>
> Subject: Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
> - --------------5347507F890CE76E464AFC80
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> Oh please share your project about ceramic insects. I'm sure others are
> interested as well.
>
> river002 wrote:
>
> > Sher, Since you've been doing all that preparation, you have the basis
> > for a couple of great clay units! Two items come to mind: one, take
the
> > plant drawings, transfer them to handmade tiles and adhere
them to
> > plywood
> > with mastic. This creates a wonderful frame around a window in the
> > school. This was done very successfully in my school 2 years ago
and
> > still brings admiring comments. (Plus it leaves behind a little part
of
> > those fifth graders!) Secondly, another success with fifth graders
and
> > clay was to create dragonflies, lizards, caterpillars, etc. during a
> > ecological study of creatures indigenous to our area. We glazed
the
> > creatures and placed them outside in an area near the Butterfly
> > Garden. I'll be happy to share more details later if these
> > ideas are generating any dendrites, right now it's late and I can't
believe
> > I'm sitting here pounding away at the keyboard. Let me know......
> >
> > "...5th grade so far has been concentrating on values and still lifes
and
> > using values to make objects look real,,,,, plus they are using ezcut
for
> > relief
> > printing; drawing plants from outside for the subject matter..."
>
>
>
> - --------------5347507F890CE76E464AFC80
> Content-Type: text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii; name="vcard.vcf"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> Content-Description: Card for Melissa Chaney
> Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="vcard.vcf"
>
> begin: vcard
> fn: Melissa Chaney
> n: Chaney;Melissa
> org: Ray-Pec Schools Peculiar, MO
> email;internet: meemo
> title: Shull 6th Grade Art
> x-mozilla-cpt: ;0
> x-mozilla-html: FALSE
> version: 2.1
> end: vcard
>
>
> - --------------5347507F890CE76E464AFC80--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 01:21:46 -0400
> From: marcia m eaton <marciameaton>
> Subject: Another Walk Through Trajan's Forum
>
>
> Dear colleagues:
> You are invited to join the third and final Philosophers Forum walk
> through Trajan’s Forum in Rome.
>
> On the ArtsEdNet Web site you will find the conversation between our two
> guest philosophers, Dr. Marcia Muelder Eaton and Dr. Ronald Moore, at
>
http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/resources/Philos/Walk3/index.html.
> This last section is called "Time Detectives," and looks at the way we
> interpret evidence about the beliefs and values of people who lived in
> the past. The ArtsEdNet Web site also includes classroom activities
> developed by Dr. Marilyn G. Stewart that complement the discussion.
>
> From now through 22 April, the questions we’ll consider include
> *What conclusions could your students draw about Roman life based on the
> evidence provided by Trajan's Forum?
> *What conclusions do you think people in the future will draw about our
> culture from the evidence they are likely to find?
> *What artworks do you expect will survive?
> *Do you think that people in the future would be likely to learn more
> about us from our artworks than from our garbage dumps?
>
> From April 26 through May 17, we’ll consider whether artworks give us a
> true picture of the world. Are there are any reasons why the panels on
> Trajan's column may have distorted the truth.
> *Are there any twentieth-century artworks that present a distorted or
> one-sided view of the truth?
> *Is art by nature selective in the way it tells the truth?
> *And to what extent does our own understanding of an artwork reflect our
> own values and beliefs?
>
> Thank you for joining the recent discussion on meaning—it took on a life
> of its own and developed many unexpected twists and turns. Please take a
> look at "Time Detectives" online and join us for our conversation!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 06:40:55 +0100
> From: "John Bibby (QED of York, England)" <qed>
> Subject: RE: Take 5--Art and Mathematics
>
> Can anyone tell me more about the Art and Mathematics poster please? (or
> even send me one!)
>
> Thanks
> JOHN BIBBY
>
>
> QED/MatheMagic
> 1 Straylands Grove
> York YO31 1EB, England
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: owner-artsednet.edu
> > [owner-artsednet.edu]On Behalf Of Scurfield
> > Sent: 04 April 1999 12:41
> > To: artsednet.edu
> > Subject: Take 5--Art and Mathematics
> >
> >
> > After re-reading my "review" of the Pam Stephens and Co./Jim
McNeill
> > workshop at the NAEA I realized that I didn't begin to say
> > all the good
> > things I intended to about it. I also work a couple days a
> > week for a
> > new organization in Wichita--Arts Partners. Our job is to
> > integrate art
> > into the general education curriculum by bringing more artists and
> > residencies into the school, so I was very interested in the
> > collaboration with Jim. Also the Take 5 poster series,
> > Art and Mathematics, Art and Social Studies, Art and
> > Language Arts and
> > now, Art and Science and Art and Music is certainly an idea
> > whose time
> > has come. I'm planning to order them for my art methods classes at
> > Wichita State and recommend them to the Art Resource Center of the
> > Wichita Art Museum. I saw the posters briefly at the
> > Crystal booth last
> > year and was interested, but there is nothing like meeting
> > the designers
> > of the project, not to mention one of the artists, to get me
moving!
> > Marcia Scurfield
> > Derby, KS
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 1999 05:39:19 -0400
> From: Linda Stauffer <artistlps>
> Subject: Potter's Wheel Plans
>
> For all of you who read my March 1998 posting for potters wheel plans.
> Please stop sending me requests for the plans. I scanned the pages about
> 6 months ago and posted them at my web site. go to
> http://members.aol.com/staufferl/index.html> and follow the link to the
> treadle wheel plans.
>
> - --
> Linda P. Stauffer
>
> Stauffer Ceramics new site!
> <http://members.aol.com/staufferl/index.html>
> Quakertown Swim Teams <http://members.aol.com/artistlps/QSST.html>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 1999 05:44:49 -0400
> From: Linda Stauffer <artistlps>
> Subject: Re: clay project ideas for 5th graders-help!
>
> Have you ever tried making clay whistles? I make them with my students
and
> they love them! Below is a site that explains how to make clay whistles
>
> http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/Canopy/2525/whistles/whistle.html
>
>
> - --
> Linda P. Stauffer
>
> Stauffer Ceramics new site! <http://members.aol.com/staufferl/index.html>
> Quakertown Swim Teams <http://members.aol.com/artistlps/QSST.html>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 1999 07:17:21 -0400
> From: Ann Weaver <aweaver>
> Subject: Re: collecting feathers
>
> It's interesting that my current issue of Audubon(March-April 1999) has a
> question about feathers that I read just this morning. I knew I had to
have the
> salvage permit, but no information came with it that told what I've
quoted
> below. (I would not have known about the salvage permit if not told
about it in
> a NC State Museum of Natural Science workshop). The article states,
>
> "Possessing a plume from nearly any bird species in the United States is
verboten
> - - even if you just happened to discover it lying on the ground, and
even if it
> was shed in the normal course of molting. Most birds, save a few
nonnative ones
> like starlings and house sparrows, are protected by the Migratory Bird
Treaty
> Act, which makes it illegal to kill them or possess any of their body
parts.
> The maximum penalty for possession of feathers, a misdemeanor, is six
months in
> prison and a $5,000 fine. If you sell items containing such feathers,
you're
> asking for more trouble: You could be charged with a felony, spend two
years in
> jail, and face a fine of $250,000. If you continue to use feathers in
your
> crafts, stick to those from domestic fowl, such as chickens and turkeys,
or from
> game birds that you have legally hunted, such as ducks and pheasants. If
you
> need further clarification , call the nearest state or federal fish and
wildlife
> agency."
> ann in nc
>
> From: Ann Weaver <aweaver>
>
> Here in NC people must obtain a salvage permit to collect feathers, bird
nests,
> even dead animals for stuffing. I applied for one for our school and
received it
> so that we can legally collect such items. Right now we are having an
owl
> stuffed (one that was found dead, stuck in a fence). What is the
procedure in
> other states?
>
> LMiller435 wrote:
>
> > Yes, I had heard that about feathers. I get plenty from the roosters at
a farm
> > and I'm always finding goose and hawk feathers when I ride my horse.
Plenty of
> > exercise getting off and on to collect the feathers from the ground.
> > I wash them in dishwashing liquid when I get back to school and leave
them
> > drying over night on newspaper.
> >
> > Leslie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 07:50:26 -0500
> From: "Betty Bowen" <bbowen.ok.us>
> Subject: Re: feathers
>
> For health safety, wash feathers in an enzyme-type laundry detergent.
>
> If you want to use them to print watercolors with, brush them with
diluted
> ivory soap first.
>
> Betty
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 08:28:49 -0500
> From: marianna delafield <mdelafield>
> Subject: RE: collecting feathers
>
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Ann Weaver [SMTP:aweaver]
> Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 1999 6:17 AM
> To: LMiller435; artsednet; Ann Weaver
> Subject: Re: collecting feathers
>
> It's interesting that my current issue of Audubon(March-April 1999) has a
> question about feathers that I read just this morning. I knew I had to
have the
> [marianna delafield] I have used feathers in my work, and I urge you to
beware: Sometimes these birds, beautiful that they are, have mites and you
need to be sure that they are killed, even the eggs, before you begin to
use them. I brought peacock feathers into the house to use in a wool
basket that I had made; hand spun wool, onion and overdyed indigo dye. The
mites, which couldn't be seen became moths, and I didn't know where they
were coming from. When I finally discovered the source they had devoured
the basket and had started to eat the glue in the binding of my
grandfathers bible. When you bring fathers in it was suggested to me that
you put Borax (twenty mule team) and table salt in a plastic bag and hang
them for a couple weeks in the garage or somewhere out of the house and out
of the way. I have since done this many times with pheasant skins and it
works. No more problems with small flying things. yuck !!! Marianna
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 08:30:30 -0500
> From: "Betty Bowen" <bbowen.ok.us>
> Subject: Re: heirsh core
>
> >>my school is incorporating the heirsh core
>
> I'm sorry, I don't know this term. Would you explain please?
> Betty
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 08:29:42 -0500
> From: "Betty Bowen" <bbowen.ok.us>
> Subject: Re: hand printing
>
> I've tried about everything for hand printing over the years. I do
woodcuts
> and they tend to be rather large. For awhile I was hooked on a wooden
butter
> paddle (a benefit of going to school in Wisconsin). I've eyed the metal
> paddles at the meat market for scooping up ground meat. I've used metal
and
> wooden spoons and a variety of Japanese barens.
>
> My hands down favorite - the thing I reach for automatically -- is two
> wooden drawer pulls glued back to back. One side is round (like a disc
more
> than a ball) and one is square. I've used mine enough (10 years) that it
is
> shiny and very very smooth. The square side allows me to really "scrape"
> with an edge or make marks with the rounded corner, and the round side
acts
> like a spoon, but with more leverage. I tend to use the round side to
hold
> and the square side to print. With a spoon, to really get enough
pressure, I
> had to push with a finger in the bowl of the spoon and over the years
this
> can cause a lot of damage.
> I have had much less hand fatigue using the drawer pull, because my hand
is
> in a more natural position and requires less force.
>
> Porcelain doorknobs are really nice part of the time, but I like the
little
> bit of "drag" the wood gives, and the chisel edge of the square knob. If
I
> could glue the porcelain shell (without the metal stem) to the back of
the
> square drawer pull, that might make the best tool of all.
>
> What glues porcelain to wood?
>
> Betty
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 08:43:50 -0500
> From: "Betty Bowen" <bbowen.ok.us>
> Subject: Re; feathers
>
> About the enzyme-based detergent - be sure to also use it to soak any
animal
> bones you collect.
>
> BB
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 06 Apr 1999 09:17:02 +0100
> From: cmckeon (Hingham - Foster - Cynthia - McKeon)
> Subject: digest vs. individual
>
> Does anyone who gets the digest ever feel as if they are not getting all
> of the postings? Quite often I see replys to questions that I have not
> seen. I am thinking of un*ubscribing to the digest to get the
> individual postings.
>
> Thanks! Cynthia
>
>
> ps - have you been to:
> http://www.webgalleries.com/pm/quotes/quotes.html ?
> nice artist quotes here. This one reminded me of both art and
> teaching:
>
>
> Blessed are they who see beautiful things
> in
> humble places where other people see
> nothing.
> C. PISSARRO
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 6 Apr 1999 10:18:12 -0500
> From: marianna delafield <mdelafield>
> Subject: RE: collecting feathers
>
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Ann Weaver [SMTP:aweaver]
> Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 1999 8:13 AM
> To: marianna delafield
> Subject: Re: collecting feathers
>
> Once as a very young child I picked up a fallen bird nest and was
immediately covered with bird lice, crawling up my arm and all over my
little body. My horrified mother dunked me into a tub of water and pushed
my head under and got rid of the critters, but I never forgot it and am
very careful what I pick up now that pertains to birds. Are the mites too
small to be seen without a magnifying glass? How did you discover what
they were?
>
> [marianna delafield] Well, Ann, I don't really recall, except that they
were all over the house, had made cocoons in the mats of prints, flying, it
was just awful, and I guess that I tracked them down to were they seem to
be leaving a trail. Its been years since it happened, and I think we
"bombed the whole house" with insect bombs, and since then I've been very
careful. And had no trouble. Wild turkey feathers, pheasant skins, ostrich
feathers, peacock feathers, all these birds are a potential hazard, but can
be treated with the 20 mule team and salt concoction. I put the stuff into
a plastic bag, shake it and then put the feathers into it and shake again.
I don't have proportions, maybe a half cup of each.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1339
> ********************************
>
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