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Lesson Plans


Re: Watercolor

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
carla schiller (charwitt.us)
Sun, 26 Apr 1998 19:38:55 -0700 (PDT)


He's got a few - Artemesia Gentilleschi and Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun, for
example. But he doesn't seem very comfortable with women artists, IMHO.
--Carla

Carla Schiller, Esq.
Teacher, Highly Gifted Magnet
North Hollywood High School, CA
e-mail: charwitt.us
webpage index: http://lausd.k12.ca.us/~charwitt/index.html
*************************************************************************************
"When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not
know a thing, to allow that you do not know it--this is knowledge."
--Kongzi (Confucius)
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On Sat, 25 Apr 1998, Mike Keller wrote:

>
> > Western art has argued - since the beginning - whether sculpture or
> > painting is BEST.
> > But, the least valued art in the traditional hierarchy is art traditionally
> > made by women, such as needlework, quilts, china painting,
> > flower-paintings, pastel-drawing and watercolor.
>
> So has Jansen (sp) ever added female artists to the classic Art History text
> History of Art in the Western World? (I think that's the title, but you get the
> idea) When I studied Art History, the only female artists we studied were
> unknown African potters and weavers.
>
>
> Michael Keller
> Old and New Media
>