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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #717

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Mike Ehrlich (me41590)
Thu, 09 Apr 1998 13:34:04 -0600 (CST)


Responding to the message of Tue, 07 Apr 1998 11:47:28 -0700 (PDT)
from owner-artsednet-digest (artsednet-digest):
>
>
> artsednet-digest Tuesday, April 7 1998 Volume 02 : Number
> 717
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> Re: ziegler-artsednet ? posting
> senior portfolios
> Re: senior portfolios
> Alphabet of Art
> re: the great expirement
> Re: DBAE and themes
> Art Student Teaching
> Art Projects
> Art Lessons that Tie-in with Artists
> copyright laws
> Picasso Said:
> What goes in senior portfolio?
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 07 Apr 1998 06:33:59 PDT
> From: "freckles spots" <freckles_spot>
> Subject: Re: ziegler-artsednet ? posting
>
> Yes...I did a wonderful project with 5th grade students that would also
> work in middle school
>
> We asked the cafeteria people to save the large cans for us. I taped
> around the rim to keep the cans safe. Next, the students, working in
> groups, started adding beaks, legs, wings, etc to the cans using poster
> board, toilet paper tubes and egg cartons. Once they had a 3-D base
> done on the can, we paper mached the cans. The final layer was with the
> brown paper towels so the end product looked like wood.
>
> For the next step, we painted the cans. I asked the students to leave
> some of the can in it's natural color...the wood looking color...as part
> of the design.
>
> When the students were done painting, I used clear booking tape to tape
> the cans together....stacked one on top of another. We made one that
> was 8 cans high. It was very impressive looking when they were
> complete.
>
> Hope this helps.
> Judy....
> where the wind came sweeping down the plains and blew the trash
> everywhere..
>
> - ----Original Message Follows----
> Date: Mon, 06 Apr 1998 18:43:47 +0000
> From: Michael Ziegler <mziegle>
> Subject: ziegler-artsednet ? posting
> To: artsednet.edu
> Cc: rvoyles
>
> I'm interested in creating a totem pole with a junior high class.
> Doese anyone have any ideas as to what materials would suite such a
> young audience?
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 09:55:27 EDT
> From: Lydia West <LydiaWest>
> Subject: senior portfolios
>
> Hello everyone!
> Just a quick question;
> I have a 17 year old brother who recently quit high school to be home
> schooled. Since he loves art, and may want to go to art school, (and
> since
> I'm oficially an art teacher, even though I'm currently just a lowly
> sub,) he
> asked me to help him develop a good portfolio for college applocation.
> So my question is, what sorts of things should he (ideally) have in
> there?
> What types of things really tend to catch interviewers' eyes? Should he
> demonstrate mastery of "realism", experimentation with abstract concepts,
> 3-d
> work, etc.? Should he have a lot of variety or show extensive
> development of
> one area?
> Thanks in advance for your input - this is such a great resource for
> those of
> us with less experience!! :-)
> Lydia West
> Toledo OH
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 11:10:07 EDT
> From: Robben1713 <Robben1713>
> Subject: Re: senior portfolios
>
> Well, It looks like you have a good idea about what to include in the
> portfolio...I would include a variety of mediums and styles, but I would
> also
> include a series of some sort.....to show developement, transition and
> application in different medium...For example, using one subject matter
> and
> exicute it in 3-d, drawing, painting and so on and maybe include the
> steps
> that he arrived at these artworks...ie: plans and sketches for the 3-d
> work...
> Jessica
> ( yet another subsititute)
> Good luck!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 07 Apr 1998 09:47:33 +0000
> From: Christine Merriam <ktwnldy.az.us>
> Subject: Alphabet of Art
>
> Hi,
> While perusing the PBS Teacher web page, I found this link, thought it
> should
> be shared:
>
> http://www.atl.mindspring.com/~massa/alphabet.html
>
> This site describes the Alphabet of Art, a notation system for visual
> design.
> The alphabet was developed by the
> late Robert J. McKnight, a sculptor, designer, and theoretician of art.
> McKnight believed that the historical development of
> communication systems paralleled the development of the senses in the
> individual. Just as a newborn child orients itself to
> the world first by touch, then hearing, and only later by eyesight, so
> objective systems of communication developed in that
> order. First came the numerical system, based on our fingers and the
> sense of
> touch. Next came the alphabet, based on our
> sense of hearing. McKnight saw the evolution of a visual notation system
> as
> the next logical step--hence the Alphabet of Art.
>
> Christine Merriam
> Kayenta Intermediate School
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 07 Apr 1998 13:02:05 -0500
> From: gerardo larsen <gl29435>
> Subject: re: the great expirement
>
> this is the first time I've ever heard of such activities. It is a
> surprise to hear that such a large scale meditation effort is taking
> place. we've come to a point in humanity where we either come together
> or vanish, and it is hopefull to see such efforts. i will gladly join.
> in my own life i have been opened up to the energy which is being
> human. something that is much more than one can fathom. we are trully
> magical beings and it absolutely true that we create the world we live
> in. now is a time of change as it alway is, has been, and will be. so,
> lets allow ourselves to evolve into this new world were there is peace,
> love, and understanding. lets free the magic. our spirit is shouting
> for it. the earth is criing for it. and i am hoping for it.
>
> as Bob Marley would say "meditate and pray"
> "free yourselves from mental slavery for non
> but ourselves can free our minds"
>
> peace.love.
> gerardo
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 5 Apr 1998 17:19:07 -0500
> From: "Kimberly Calkins" <calkinsk>
> Subject: Re: DBAE and themes
>
> This is a possible helpful hint when working with DBAE and
> themes/topics. This is a technique we are currently using in an Art
> Education class at Indiana State University. We are creating a
> thematic unit with various topics that relate to the thematic
> unit.
> First, we chose a broad theme (I chose cultural symbolism: animal
> imagery). Then we made a web of ideas that related to that the theme.
> Those ideas turned into the topics. (A few of my topics included
> Oaxacan wood carvings, Islamic zoomorphic calligraphy, and Mimbre
> pottery). We also had to create possible lessons/activities that we
> had to describe what components of DBAE fit into the
> lessons/activities. This was all in a chart form that included other
> components to fill out. But this is just the beginning of the
> thematic lesson requirements. It has been a great way to organize
> the information in order to prepare for the longer version of the
> unit (lesson plans, etc.).
>
> If you have any more specific questions about the format Amanda, just
> e-mail me at calkinsk
>
> Good Luck!
>
> Kimberly Calkins
> Indiana State University
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 05 Apr 1998 16:55:02 +0000
> From: "Sheri A. Woodard" <swoodard.us>
> Subject: Art Student Teaching
>
> Hello fellow educators,
> I am concerned about an issue, and I am wondering if this is going on
> across the board for all universities that are preparing students to
> become art teachers. In the fall I have agreed to work with a student
> teacher from a nearby university. At this university the art student
> teachers only work in an art setting for 5 weeks and then are placed
> in a regular education classroom for 10 weeks. The university feels
> that these students will most likely lose their jobs as art teachers
> and it is important for them to be trained for both arenas. I could
> go on about my feelings on this issue, but I would love to hear some
> reactions to this issue. I hope that any of you that are involved
> with the training of future teachers would respond and explain your
> programs.
>
> Thank you for reading my message.
> Sheri Woodard
> swoodard.us
> Sherri: Where are you going to school, and what is your major? Am I
misinterpreting what you're saying, or is your professor discouraging you
from becoming an art teacher? I can see that it's important to know some
of what happens in other classrooms, but it doesn't make sense that they
would tell you that you will "most likely" lose your job as an art teacher.

MGE
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 12:21:29 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <l_j_cox>
> Subject: Art Projects
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
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>
> Here is a list of Art Projects for elementary aged children:
>
> 1. Create a Rain Forest Environment by twisting brown butcher paper into
> =
> tree trunks and branches (usually in a corner); make large leaves and =
> flowers to hang from the branches; makes Rainforest animals, birds, =
> reptiles and insects to add to the tree. This can spread around the =
> room as far as you have room. =20
> 2. For Chinese New Year: Dragon drawing; Tiger, if year of tiger, =
> etc......Using watered-down black tempera (instead of ink) paint large =
> Chinese letters (samples on board) - giving several choices.
> 3. To teach perspective, draw overlapping landscape then paint in =
> watercolor.
> 4. At Halloween, I do a Native American unit that includes making a =
> choice of four Native American masks using tagboard, colored paper, =
> markers, sequins, yarn, beads and feathers...they get a lot of choice as
> =
> how to finish their own mask. (Often some of the children are too poor =
> to afford Halloween costumes and this helps to fill the gap. I ask for =
> donations to display in the hall of the masks and the other artwork we =
> have done (drawings of birds, animals, fish and Native Americans =
> primarily), one from each student...that way if they want to keep their =
> mask, they can. =20
> 5. At Halloween, I also draw a bat and a witch with the students. =
> (Art, not "cute." I don't do "cute.") =20
> 6. Still life =3D set up some plants where all can see.
> 7. At Christmas, as at all Holidays, I try to be very neutral. Santa =
> Claus is Father Christmas, a sorcerer, a wizard, etc......I do a =
> Reindeer (or a deer), an angel, a cardinal, a nutcracker and a =
> ballerina. Nothing "cute." Or controversial. The children Love It! =
> And again, some are poor and this is the only gift that they will have =
> to give.
> 8. For the Fourth of July: Uncle Sam, Statue of Liberty, Rockets =3D =
> Space drawings, Eagle in front of flag.
> 9. When introducing watercolor, I pick easy subjects: Cactus in a =
> desert landscape, Angelfish, Whale, Flowers (tulip, pansy, sunflower).
> These are just a few of lessons that have worked for me. It's meant to
> =
> help some of you, not start a controversy. Linda
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_000E_01BD621F.B139B7E0
> Content-Type: text/html;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
> <HTML>
> <HEAD>
>
> <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
> http-equiv=3DContent-Type>
> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.2106.6"' name=3DGENERATOR>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>Here is a list of <STRONG><U>Art =
> Projects</U></STRONG>=20
> for elementary aged children:</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>1. Create a Rain Forest Environment by =
> twisting brown=20
> butcher paper into tree trunks and branches (usually in a corner); make =
> large=20
> leaves and flowers to hang from the branches; makes Rainforest animals, =
> birds,=20
> reptiles and insects to add to the tree.&nbsp; This can spread around =
> the room=20
> as far as you have room.&nbsp; </FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>2. For Chinese New Year:&nbsp; Dragon =
> drawing;&nbsp;=20
> Tiger, if year of tiger, etc......Using watered-down black tempera =
> (instead of=20
> ink) paint large Chinese letters (samples on board) - giving several=20
> choices.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>3. To teach perspective, draw overlapping =
> landscape=20
> then paint in watercolor.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>4. At Halloween, I do a Native American unit =
> that=20
> includes making a choice of four Native American masks using tagboard, =
> colored=20
> paper, markers, sequins, yarn, beads and feathers...they get a lot of =
> choice as=20
> how to finish their own mask.&nbsp; (Often some of the children are too =
> poor to=20
> afford Halloween costumes and this helps to fill the gap.&nbsp; I ask =
> for=20
> donations to display in the hall of the masks and the other artwork we =
> have done=20
> (drawings of birds, animals, fish and Native Americans primarily), one =
> from each=20
> student...that way if they want to keep their mask, they can.&nbsp;=20
> </FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>5.&nbsp; At Halloween, I also draw a bat and =
> a witch=20
> with the students.&nbsp; (Art, not &quot;cute.&quot;&nbsp; I don't do=20
> &quot;cute.&quot;)&nbsp; </FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>6.&nbsp; Still life =3D set up some plants =
> where all can=20
> see.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>7.&nbsp; At Christmas, as at all Holidays, I =
> try to be=20
> very neutral.&nbsp; Santa Claus is Father Christmas, a sorcerer, a =
> wizard,=20
> etc......I do a Reindeer (or a deer), an angel, a cardinal, a nutcracker
> =
> and a=20
> ballerina.&nbsp; Nothing &quot;cute.&quot;&nbsp; Or controversial.&nbsp;
> =
> The=20
> children Love It!&nbsp; And again, some are poor and this is the only =
> gift that=20
> they will have to give.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000></FONT>8. For the Fourth of July: Uncle Sam, =
> Statue of=20
> Liberty, Rockets =3D Space drawings, Eagle in front of flag.</DIV>
> <DIV>9. When introducing watercolor, I pick easy subjects:&nbsp; Cactus =
> in a=20
> desert landscape, Angelfish, Whale, Flowers (tulip, pansy, =
> sunflower).</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>&nbsp; These are just a few of lessons that =
> have worked=20
> for me. It's meant to help some of you, not start a controversy.&nbsp;=20
> Linda</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_000E_01BD621F.B139B7E0--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 11:39:37 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <l_j_cox>
> Subject: Art Lessons that Tie-in with Artists
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
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>
> Here is a list of Lesson Plans that Tie-in with Artists:
>
> 1. Picasso: Abstract Face- cubism drawing
> 2. Matisse: Paper Cutouts
> 3. Van Gogh: "Starry Night" - crayon resist watercolor painting
> "Sunflower" - drawing - tie-in with spring =
> planting
> 4. Rousseau: Jungle drawing/toucan/monkey - tie-in with Rainforest
> 5. Magritte: surrealism - eye =3D free choices for pupil area
> 6. O'Keefe: Pansy painting
> 7. Peter Max: Black Line - space art - tie-in with space studies
> 8. Escher: Tessellations - math tie-in
> 9. Degas: Horse - pastel drawing=20
> Ballerina - pastel drawing
> 10. Chagall: Floating Figures of Disproportionate Sizes - crayon resist =
> watercolor painting
> 11. Rivera: Murals - Tempera on butcher paper (usually culturally =
> diverse theme)
> 12. Kahlo: Self-Portrait - drawing
> 13. Stella: Protractor art - tie-in with math
> 14. Warhol: Pop Art - tie-in with social studies (commercialism)
>
> I talk about other artists - these art the ones I have specific lessons =
> worked out for elementary aged children.=20
>
>
>
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> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
> <HTML>
> <HEAD>
>
> <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
> http-equiv=3DContent-Type>
> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.2106.6"' name=3DGENERATOR>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
> <DIV>Here is a list of <STRONG><U>L</U></STRONG><STRONG><U>esson Plans=20
> </U></STRONG><U><STRONG>that Tie-in with Artists</STRONG></U>:</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>1. Picasso: Abstract Face- cubism drawing</DIV>
> <DIV>2. Matisse: Paper Cutouts</DIV>
> <DIV>3. Van Gogh: &quot;Starry Night&quot; - crayon resist watercolor=20
> painting</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;<FONT=20
>
color=3D#000000>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nb=
>
>
sp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbs=
>
> p;=20
> &quot;Sunflower&quot; - drawing - tie-in with spring =
> planting</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>4. Rousseau: Jungle drawing/toucan/monkey - =
> tie-in with=20
> Rainforest</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>5. Magritte: surrealism - eye =3D free =
> choices for pupil=20
> area</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>6. O'Keefe: Pansy painting</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>7. Peter Max: Black Line - space art - tie-in
> =
> with=20
> space studies</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>8. Escher: Tessellations - math =
> tie-in</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>9. Degas: Horse - pastel drawing =
> </FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT=20
>
color=3D#000000>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nb=
>
> sp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;=20
> Ballerina - pastel drawing</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>10. Chagall: Floating Figures of =
> Disproportionate Sizes=20
> - - crayon resist watercolor painting</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000></FONT>11. Rivera: Murals - Tempera on =
> butcher paper=20
> (usually culturally diverse theme)</DIV>
> <DIV>12. Kahlo: Self-Portrait - drawing</DIV>
> <DIV>13. Stella: Protractor art - tie-in with math</DIV>
> <DIV>14. Warhol: Pop Art - tie-in with social studies =
> (commercialism)</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>I talk about other artists - these art the ones I have specific =
> lessons=20
> worked out for elementary aged children. </DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_0005_01BD6219.D8043220--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 07 Apr 1998 14:27:22 -0500 (EST)
> From: "the girl's in circles" <R567467H>
> Subject: copyright laws
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> can anyone point me in the direction of an article- or where to find an
> article- dealing with teacher copyright laws?
>
> thanks so much,
> please email me privately-
> Renee
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 12:34:50 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <l_j_cox>
> Subject: Picasso Said:
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
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>
> "I used to draw like Raphael, but it has taken me a whole lifetime to =
> learn to draw like children." Picasso.
> Linda
>
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> charset="iso-8859-1"
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>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
> <HTML>
> <HEAD>
>
> <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
> http-equiv=3DContent-Type>
> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.2106.6"' name=3DGENERATOR>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>&quot;I used to draw like Raphael, but it has
> =
> taken me=20
> a whole lifetime to learn to draw like children.&quot;&nbsp;=20
> Picasso.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000>Linda</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_004E_01BD6221.8F02A540--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 7 Apr 1998 08:50:26 -1000
> From: David Zimmerman <fastedy>
> Subject: What goes in senior portfolio?
>
> Lydia:
>
> The best way to get this information is to pick up a few art school
> catalogues. They are very specific about what is to be presented in
> potfolios for application and you can use it as a guide. Generally they
> want to see that the students can handle a variety of media and subject
> matter. (This is an important point that I pass on to my students who
> continue to sing a one note song in art like cartoon characters!)
>
> Several examples of pencil drawing should show skill at rendering and
> shading. Pen and ink should show the same, using crosshatching or other
> inking techniques to reveal shading. Examples of painting might reveal
> experience in different kinds of paint and application techniques.
> Creative
> design projects are also suggested. One or two examples of 3-D work
> should
> include photographic views of the project from several sides.
> Most schools are interested in seeing how students handle traditional
> subject matter including portraits, figure, still life and landscape.
>
> You can also call the art department of any large college or university
> and
> ask them what they are looking for. They'll be glad to help.
>
> Deb Rosenbaum
>
> >Give me ambiguity or give me something else.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #717
> *******************************
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