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Lesson Plans


Re: Holiday Art and Multicultruralism

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
elwood p dowd (harvey96)
Mon, 6 Apr 1998 06:50:02 -0400


how about a study of holocaust art during the easter season?
And don't forget about the genocide practiced by the USA on the
native american peoples. It would a perfect time to study native
peoples art forms, after all custer wore 'ARROW" shirts didn,t he?

On Sun, 5 Apr 1998 17:35:08 -1000 David Zimmerman <fastedy>
writes:
>Two recent topics on this list have got me to thinkin'.
>
>It seems to me that both Christmas and Easter offer the perfect
>opportunity
>to look at some Christian art themes. No matter what religion you
>are,
>you can't deny that the Bible and stories of the life of Christ are
>the
>meat and potatoes of western art from the Early Christian Era through
>the
>1600's. I don't think I've seen any art lessons discussed on this
>list
>using this period. We seem to have become uncomfortable dealing with
>any
>art that is religious in subject matter. It seems a back lash that we
>are
>all so absorbed in multi-cultural art projects and paying less
>attention to
>our own western culture before about 1600.
>
>As a Jew, I find this art fascinating in a secular, art historical
>context.
>One thing I've done at Christmas with my students is to study the many
>renditions of the Nativity scene. The National Gallery has a
>wonderful
>picture book on this topic and there are also some good books on
>depictions
>of Mary. I've posed students in robes and turbans for figure drawing
>and
>they then used those drawings to create a Biblical styled scene.
>Easter
>offers the same opportunity to look at the many depictions of the
>Crucifix,
>the Lamentation or the Entombment--there are literally hundreds of
>these.
>
>Presenting students with numerous renditions of the same subject,
>especially a historical one, provides a wealth of discussion topics
>and
>the opportunity for comparisons in a higher order of thinking. Why
>did the
>artist put this character here?, Is there a patron painted into the
>scene?,
>Can you find stylistic differences between northern and southern
>Europe?
>Why was religious art the only subjects painted? Who paid for these
>paintings? etc.
>
>Someone recently wrote on this list that her objective in teaching art
>was
>to make her students culturally literate enough to get all the art
>jokes on
>the Simpsons. I thought that was great. We are doing our students a
>disservice if we ignore our own artistic heritage in favor of crafty
>projects from other cultures.
>
>Deb Rosenbaum
>
>>Give me ambiguity or give me something else.
>
>
>

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