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Re: [teacherartexchange] Moldy Clay

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From: Marvin Bartel (marvinpb_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Apr 05 2011 - 21:08:17 PDT


Bleach kills bacteria. If somebody has tested it for mold in clay, let us know what you found. I have read that bleach helps if it is added to new clay, but not for old clay. It would be a good experiment to try some of the same clay and put a bit of bleach with one lump and leave a similar lump without bleach and wrap them separately in plastic over the summer and see if there is a difference in September.
Marvin

On Apr 5, 2011, at 8:16 PM, Deborah Sterner wrote:

I heard that just a bit of bleach helps

On Tue, Apr 5, 2011 at 6:09 PM, pam smith <thinkart2003@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Marvin,
> You are much better at this than I am. I too had smelly reclaimeed clay and I
> know to kill the smell of house paint I read to add a little vanilla to it. I
> tried this with my clay and it really seemed to help with the smell at least.
> Have you ever heard of using vanilla or anything else?
>
> Just my two cents worth.
> Aloha
> Pam
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Sent: Mon, April 4, 2011 4:12:44 AM
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Moldy Clay
>
> Dana,
>
> I was a clay teacher for over 40 years. What you describe is common problem with
> rework clay, and even with new clay that has been in moist storage for long
> periods. In all my classroom years this a problem for only one student who
> happened to have an allergic reaction to the mold. She was hypersensitive to
> molds, and could not be in the room. For everybody else it was a bit smelly, but
> to my knowledge it was never a health risk. I believe you can safely use the
> clay. Some ventilation is always good. In my opinion, clay and glaze dust can be
> a greater problem, but there are good ways to control those by using only wet
> smoothing and wet cleaning methods. Avoid sanding, counter brushes, brooms, and
> vacuum cleaners.
> You can search Hazards in Ceramics and/or Cleaning and working with less clay
> dust for more information.
>
> Marvin
>
> On Apr 4, 2011, at 8:19 AM, Paternoster, Dana wrote:
>
> I have a clay question. I have clay in my classroom that was bricks when I got
> here six years ago, and that I have recently been reclaiming. I seems to be
> molding very quickly. I may be mixing different kinds of clay together too.
>
>
> It smells really bad, and I have been telling the kids that the clay is old, and
> could be moldy and that is why it stinks. They are just grateful to get to use
> it, and have not been complaining, but I am also not requiring them to use it,
> either.
>
> Is there a way to kill the mold? It does not seem to be just on the surface,
> but going through the clay. That is unless I have a grey clay mixed with the
> other, but the grey parts of the clay stinks worse than the rest.
>
> Am I in big danger of making us all sick?
>
> I don't have money to buy new clay.
>
> Thanks for your help.
>
>
>
>
> Dana Paternoster
> Visual Art Department
> Seaford Senior High School
> Seaford, Delaware
> (302) 629-4587 ex. 248
> Department Web Site
>
>
>
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