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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: April 20, 2007

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From: Sherry Callen (callenart_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Apr 21 2007 - 17:44:46 PDT


RE: Clay finishes
I have had good luck with tempera and watercolor paints. Yes that's right.
  Watercolors leave a faded stonelike appearance. It has worked well for my
lighthouse projects. For brighter colors cake tempera worls nicely. For a
more permanent finish we add Modge Podge which also adds gloss. The kids
like the added control they have using the paints and Modge Podge...a real
plus in elementary classes.
Sherry

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>From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: April 20, 2007
>Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2007 00:00:03 -0800
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Friday, April 20, 2007.
>
>1. Finishes for clay
>2. Re: paper mache balloons
>3. RE: Finishes for clay
>4. Re: Finishes for clay
>5. Re: Finishes for clay
>6. Re: Backgrounds
>7. Re: Backgrounds
>8. Re: teacherartexchange digest: April 18, 2007
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Finishes for clay
>From: Heather_Hayes@roundrockisd.org
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 09:15:59 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>I was hoping for a few ideas. My kiddos have fallen in love with clay this
>year - to the point that they're even recycling it themselves. The
>projects just keep getting better and better. Unfortunately, my supply of
>glaze is just about gone, and I have NO money (I'm totally broke - no $ in
>either the school account or my own personal bank account) to buy
>additional glaze this year. It's a shame to me that these last few
>projects - the best ones yet - aren't going to get glazed.
>
>I've had a couple of kids try painting them w/ acrylic paints, but they
>wind up looking uber-cheesy.
>
>Suggestions for good ways to finish off these projects? Most aren't
>food/water vessels, so anything could be used. (I've reserved the
>last little bits of glaze for the food vessel projects.)
>
>I know this has been discussed previously, but I didn't pay attention to
>the suggestions because I wasn't doing clay at the time. (Shame on me!!)
>
>
>
>Heather Hayes
>Visual Art
>Ridgeview Middle School
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: paper mache balloons
>From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 07:56:39 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
>I have done paper mache balloons for quite a few
>years, and here are some technical issues I have had
>to resolve:
>
>Because of the long drying time of balloons, they tend
>to lose air during construction, so use only balloons
>made for helium, because they are stronger and last
>weeks.
>
>Use sturdy layers of office waste paper cut into
>strips or construction paper cut likewise and laminate
>at least 5-8 layers on each balloon before painting.
>It prevents collapse if the balloon armature loses air
>for some reason.
>
>Drying balloons is no picnic because of thier relative
>large size, so find a way to suspend the balloons in
>the room in order to circulate air around them and
>hasten drying. I use panty hose dryers and hang the
>balloons upside down from a string attached to the
>knot on the balloon.
>
>Use acrylic paint or house paint to add color to the
>balloon. Acrylic paint is a type of polymer that is
>essentially a coating of plastic, which will
>strengthen the laminations and provide a moisture
>proof coating for the balloon.
>
>I usually attach yarn across the balloon in order to
>suspend a small basket or cup under the sculpture, and
>have the kids make clay people to put in the basket,
>which provides weight to hold the srings in place.
>
>This project is very nice when completed, but takes
>several class sessions to complete, so it is probably
>best done in the fall when time is not so critical.
>
>Hope this helps, Jerry
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: Finishes for clay
>From: "JAMES PETERS" <JPETERS@bsd124.org>
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 11:01:42 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>Hi I have found that you can stain white earthenware with regular
>Tempera. I do this by having the students completely paint the whole
>project one color with the tempera then wash the paint off. It doesn't
>matter when the student washes their project if the paint is wet or dry.
>The earthenware is porous enough to absorb the colors. It will create
>an antique effect of the color used. If your students want their
>projects to be shiny simple have them clear coat it with spray paint. I
>usually discourage my students from using multiple colors for this
>technique but I did have one student who tried it with some success.
>
>James D. Peters
>3-D Art=20
>Yeokum Middle School
>Belton School Dist. C124
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Heather_Hayes@roundrockisd.org
>[mailto:Heather_Hayes@roundrockisd.org]=20
>Sent: Friday, April 20, 2007 9:16 AM
>To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] Finishes for clay
>
>I was hoping for a few ideas. My kiddos have fallen in love with clay
>this=20
>year - to the point that they're even recycling it themselves. The=20
>projects just keep getting better and better. Unfortunately, my supply
>of=20
>glaze is just about gone, and I have NO money (I'm totally broke - no $
>in=20
>either the school account or my own personal bank account) to buy=20
>additional glaze this year. It's a shame to me that these last few=20
>projects - the best ones yet - aren't going to get glazed.
>
>I've had a couple of kids try painting them w/ acrylic paints, but they=20
>wind up looking uber-cheesy.
>
>Suggestions for good ways to finish off these projects? Most aren't=20
>food/water vessels, so anything could be used. (I've reserved the
>last little bits of glaze for the food vessel projects.)
>
>I know this has been discussed previously, but I didn't pay attention to
>
>the suggestions because I wasn't doing clay at the time. (Shame on
>me!!)
>
>
>
>Heather Hayes
>Visual Art
>Ridgeview Middle School
>
>
>---
>To unsubscribe go to=20
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Finishes for clay
>From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 14:12:47 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>Hi Heather,
>
>The type of alternate finishes I provided depended on the project. The
>aesthetics of the finished piece was important. Here are some....
>
>1. Watercolors as a stain on fish sculptures - related colors looked
>best. Finish with gloss medium. (similar to Peter's idea).
>
>2, Brown and black acrylic on masks (slightly watered down and wiped
>off) to give a wood-look patina. Finish with brown wax shoe polish.
>This finish also looked good on textured vessels. The former teacher
>at the high school used wood stains for a similar look (acrylics are
>safer for kids to use). I did use some water base stains with success.
>
>3. FLAT black paint - then colored with oil pastels or oil sticks. You
>need to add white to your colors to make them show up best. I got this
>idea from ceramic artist David Stabley. He use oil sticks and Amaco
>Rub 'n Buff but the oil pastels are much cheaper.
>
>4. Flat black and/or brown paint - then light dusting of metallic
>(silver for aluminum look - gold for bronze look). Light accents of
>Rub 'n Buff. Good for sculptural pieces
>
>5. Solid color of paint (choice of brown and/or black) - then stone
>fleck paint. Good for sculptural pieces.
>
>6. India ink stain - washed off.... gave a stone look finish - Then
>water color accents. This was used for Pre-Columbian inspired
>sculptures.
>
>7. For more skilled students.... layering of brown/black paint - the
>layering of metallic paints (copper and/or gold) - then careful
>highlights with Rub 'n Buff (copper and antique gold) - gives a very
>nice bronze patina.
>
>8. For advanced students - Copper topper - and Verdi-gris solution.
>Gives and antique weathered look bronze patina. Copper paint comes in
>one bottle and the acid solution in another..... Ruins brushes so use
>old ones.... Wear rubber gloves.
>
>Some of these finishes are on this lesson page:
>http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/Lessons/8rel-less.htm
>
>I have some Pre-Columbian works with some of these finishes - but
>don't have them on line.
>I will see if I can find the disk and will add them.
>
>If you want a better look with acrylics - try painting FLAT black
>first - then painting with the acrylics. Black will stay in the
>lines/textures. Try rubbing the ones already painted with acrylic with
>black wax shoe polish - rubbing it off of the raised areas and forcing
>it into the textures...or other method of forcing black into the
>textures (India ink..... black acrylic....rubbed off or raised areas).
>
>Judy Decker
>
>On 4/20/07, JAMES PETERS wrote:
> > Hi I have found that you can stain white earthenware with regular
> > Tempera. I do this by having the students completely paint the whole
> > project one color with the tempera then wash the paint off.
>
> > James D. Peters
> > 3-D Art
> > Yeokum Middle School
> > Belton School Dist. C124
>
> > From: Heather_Hayes
>
> > Subject: [teacherartexchange] Finishes for clay
> >
> > I was hoping for a few ideas.
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Finishes for clay
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 14:15:25 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
>Heather Hayes wrote:
>
> >My kiddos have fallen in love with clay this year . . . .
> >
> >Suggestions for good ways to finish off these projects? Most aren't
> >food/water vessels, so anything could be used. (I've reserved the
> >last little bits of glaze for the food vessel projects.) . . .
>
>
>When clay is painted, we call it room temperature glazing.
>
>One method uses acrylic as a base coat. Let it dry, then put on a
>contrasting tone and wipe it off before it dries to bring out the texture.
>
>Bisque or painted bisque can be waxed. Paste waxes (sold for wood) can be
>colored with old crayons, but the wax color preparation needs to be done by
>an adult. For safety to avoid blowups and serious burns, waxes have to be
>just barely melted with thermostatic control as in slow cooker, or in an
>improvised double boiler. It is very dangerous to overheat waxes. 200 F
>should be the limit.
>
>Once colored waxes are prepared, paste waxes can be used at room
>temperature. These methods need lots of old rags to wipe and polish the
>pots and sculptures. Old bristle brushes or cheap throw away brushes can
>get color into the crevices of the bisque ware.
>
>Laundry detergent and boiling hot water will clean wax out of the old
>brushes.
>
>Our students often make bisque ware stain for sculptures using iron oxide
>powder and water as a cheap stain. They wipe it off with a damp sponge to
>bring out the texture. Then they seal it with clear wax or acrylic medium
>thinned and brushed on. Clear spray (used outdoors for air safety) is
>another sealer (used after the stained piece is dry.
>
>Marvin
>
>Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
>Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
>studio phone: 574-533-0171??
>http://www.bartelart.com
>http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
>"Art is me when I am myself." ... a kindergarten girl when asked, "What is
>art?"
>"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a
>kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Backgrounds
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 14:25:34 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>Terri wrote:
>
> >. . . I am stuck with what I?want them to do for their backgrounds. Any
>original suggestions? I was thinking just to have them paint it black, to
>have the portraits stand out but it seems a little boring.
> >
>
>Maybe it is not what I want, but what each students wants. Might they be
>able to look at various backgrounds using a mirror and stepping in front of
>various backgrounds? Could it be a way for them to practice generating
>their own ideas and choice making? If I tell them what to do, they become
>dependent on me. I like to push them to make a choice. If this is too
>challenging, I would give them the option to make two different background
>sheets with tones, colors, or patterns of their choice or invention
>(depending on what they think might be appropriate for the portrait). They
>then cut and place the portrait onto the these before deciding which one
>works better. They then select the one that they feel works the best of
>the two and hand in the other one just to show me how they solved the
>problem. It is similar to when a math teacher asks the students to show
>how they solved their problems. I might list some criteria and questions
>to answer as they figure out their back
> grounds, but I would not feel qualified to decide on somebody else's
>background.
>
>Marvin
>
>Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
>Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
>studio phone: 574-533-0171??
>http://www.bartelart.com
>http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
>"Art is me when I am myself." ... a kindergarten girl when asked, "What is
>art?"
>"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a
>kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Backgrounds
>From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 14:35:10 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
>Hi Terri,
>
>See what Marvin Bartel wrotte about Backgrounds in March:
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/archive/Mar07/0127.html
>
>What if they did texture backgrounds (following the grid) in pen and ink?
>See this Chuck close lesson plan:
>http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/larry-valuegrid.htm
>
>What if they did patterns in values - white to black (see "Janet")
>http://www.albrightknox.org/ArtStart/lessonplans.html
>
>More Close lessons can be found on line....
>http://www.chuckclose.coe.uh.edu/learning/ProjectsAndActivities1.html
>some of these links are borken.
>See Teacher's Packet:
>http://www.chuckclose.coe.uh.edu/learning/index.html
>
>Regards,
>
>Judy Decker
>
>On 4/19/07, Terri wrote:
> > Hi everyone, my 8th Graders and special ed have just studied Chuck close
> and
> > they were doing the gridding system for their portraits. They are
>painting
> > them using warm and cool as an underpainting in watercolor and now are
>using
> > tempera to put a layer over it with tints and shades. I am stuck with
>what I
> > want them to do for their backgrounds. Any original suggestions?
> > I was thinking just to have them paint it black, to have the portraits
>stand
> > out but it seems a little boring.
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: April 18, 2007
>From: "Kelda Van Patten" <kelda.anne@gmail.com>
>Date: Fri, 20 Apr 2007 23:04:12 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>I am looking for some innovate suggestions/ideas/lesson plans for a
>ceramic totem pole (each student makes one section). Any successful
>ideas out there? If so, I'd love to hear about the process and see
>images of student made totems if possible. Thanks,
>Kelda
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>callenart@hotmail.com
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu

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