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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: April 22, 2006

---------

From: Colleen.Williams (colleen.williams_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Apr 23 2006 - 08:45:22 PDT


 

 Author Helps Immerse Readers/Illustrators in Adventures

            Colleen Madonna Flood Williams is one of several authors in
Windstorm Creative's Orchard Academy My Adventure Series. Colleen's titles
include; My Adventure to the Arctic, My Adventure to the Fair, My Adventure
to the Forest Clubhouse, My Adventure to the Harbor, My Adventure to the
Playground, My Adventure to the Science Center, and My Adventure to the
Secret Cave. These books allow children to immerse themselves in the
adventures by adding written details, as well as visual information to the
stories. She has also written a holiday adventure series for Windstorm that
is in production at this time and is writing for their time travel adventure
series and regional adventure series.

 

            Colleen Madonna Flood Williams explains, "These are books that
children and their parents will treasure for many years to come. The child
gets to put his/her name on the front cover and assume the role of
author/illustrator for each of these titles. The child is taken on a guided
adventure, and yet he/she gets to determine many of the feelings and sensory
elements that he/she experiences along the way. Reading, writing, and
illustrating have never been so much fun!"

 

            Flood Williams is the author of more than a dozen children's
books. She has written for Chelsea House and Mason Crest, as well as
Windstorm Creative's Orchard Academy Press. She has a Bachelor's in
Elementary Education and is a full time freelance writer, wife, mother, and
Homer Bay Club Gym Member. She is available for classroom visits and may be
reached at P.O. Box 3492, Homer, Alaska 99603.

 

To read a review of My Adventure to the Fair or My Adventure at the Forest
Clubhouse go here

http://www.yabookscentral.com/cfusion/index.cfm?fuseaction=authors.viewAutho
r&author_id=2074&CFID=1873727&CFTOKEN=38627044

Hi, there!

 

My name is Colleen Madonna Flood Williams. I am a published children's
author from Homer, Alaska. I am promoting a new series of books that I am
working on for young children. These books are part of the Orchard Academy
My Adventure Series. My first two books in this series are My Adventure to
the Fair and My Adventure to the Forest Clubhouse. They will each be
available for purchase within a month or two. Next year, a greater number
of my titles will be available, including a series on holidays, a series on
the regions of America, some time travel adventures, and some animal
adventures. Two upcoming titles that may interest Alaskans especially are
My Adventure to the Arctic and My Adventure to the Harbor. My Adventure to
the Harbor and My Adventure to the Secret Cave will be available this
summer.

 

Reading, writing, and illustrating has never been so much fun! These are
books that children and their parents will treasure for many years to come.
The child gets to put his/her name on the front cover and assume the role of
author/illustrator for each of these titles. The child is taken on a guided
adventure, and yet he/she gets to determine many of the feelings and sensory
elements that he/she experiences along the way.

 

You can see/order my titles at
http://www.windstormcreative.com/academy/2293X.htm

 

If you are a school, nonprofit group, or a bookstore or other type of book
distributor go here http://www.windstormcreative.com/orders/index.htm
to order my books at a discount.

 

(You can also see my other titles for older students by searching my name at
amazon.com.)

 

For workshop situations, I prefer working with children in first grade,
second grade, third grade, and with appropriate age/grade level special
education students up for the challenge of writing/illustrating their own
books. I have a Bachelor's Degree in Elementary Education with a minor in
Art and have some personal experience background with special education
children. If you wish to schedule a writer's workshop for children, I only
ask that students/customers be willing to each purchase one book, so that we
can work on it during my visit. If you are across the water from Homer or
further away than Anchorage, I would also ask for my transportation to and
from Homer or Anchorage to be paid for by your organization and for lodging
to be provided for me. If you are on the road system and I can drive to
your location, then transportation expenses will be minimal.

 

I will first talk to the students, then guide them through the process of
writing their own books. If time allows, I will also guide them through
illustrating the text, as well. If time does not allow, the students may
illustrate their books on their own time or with their classroom teachers or
parents.

If you contact me and want to arrange a regular author visit, book signing,
or writer's workshop, I will have my publisher contact you and set up an
author visit date. I will also contact you so that I can arrange to have
enough books with me for all of your students should you arrange for a
workshop. The books will cost under $5.00 a piece, if you order them
directly from the publisher. You may charge an additional fee to benefit
your organization for the workshop.

At the end of the visit, your students/customers will each receive a
certificate signed by me that announces their emergence as an up and coming
author/illustrator.

I hope to hear from you soon. If not, keep reading, writing, creating,
illustrating, and learning!

 

Interested in a media kit to review my work? Want to interview me? Would
you like to carry or purchase my books? Want to schedule an event?
Contact me at colleen.williams@acsalaska.net with your mailing address and
contact info.

 

Bear in mind that we can always arrange a cyber/telephone visit to your
school, too!

 

Thanks for your time,

Colleen Madonna Flood Williams

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2006 12:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: April 22, 2006

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, April 22, 2006.

1. how to deal with today's unacceptable behavior(s)
2. Re: Prepping for next year
3. Re: 20th Century American Art texbook
4. Re: Prepping for next year
5. Re: I'm an ART Teacher, not an English teacher
6. still life project online
7. NAEA Grant and Funding Alert - plus teacher openings
8. RE: I'm an ART Teacher, not an English teacher
9. Charging a lab fee in the art and computer arts classroom
10. Re: Charging a lab fee in the art and computer arts classroom
11. Value and texture
12. Re: Charging a lab fee in the art and computer arts clas...
13. Re: still life project online
14. Re: Value and texture

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: how to deal with today's unacceptable behavior(s)
From: Janice Foy <musicalmenace@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 01:03:33 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Recently I was asked to be a "sub" coach in a musical situation. I was
very excited about it because I have had great results with children
and young adults - at least I did until I took the job! Musicians I
place on a higher plane since one has to be above the average to study
an instrument and maintain the discipline to learn it. Not only was I
unable to focus on the task at hand, ie., get them through the music,
but I noticed that the one leading the section set a very unacceptable
tone for the entire coaching situation. Out of about musicians, I
think I actually reached one - by the time the second group came, it
was impossible to continue at the level I expected and I let the group
go early. I asked one musician if it is like this usually, and he
said, "they do the same thing to the regular coach" which is probably
why this person decided to take a better paying job, as I later found
out. But then, if one is doing it "for the money" in music, therein
lies another 'attitude' which may or may not be picked up from the
group with which one is dealing. That might also be part of the
'problem'.

Bottomline: there is a definite lack of respect for the person in
charge and the young people apparently are not being adequately
disciplined at home. I never saw this type of behavior in Europe nor
amongst the Asian culture. If the person is themselves not
disciplined, it isn't possible to maintain the discipline towards one's
art.

Anyone have any suggestions?? Comments?? Books to read??

Thanks, concerned professional musician/educator

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Prepping for next year
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 09:06:55 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks! It still has not been easy, and I'm still having many issues...but
I'm just not taking it home anymore and trying not to let it consume my
life.
Now that school is over in about 5 weeks, I'm feeling much more positive!
Of
course, I have a horrible cold AGAIN, but I'm looking forward to the summer.

I'm going to take a couple of courses toward my Masters, possibly get a job
at
Starbucks or something and spend the rest of the time relaxing and preparing

for next year. I really want to start off fresh next year, with a new
setup,
new procedures, new systems, everything. It's going to take a lot of work
this summer, but I'm prepared to do that. I have lots of books to read!

I do have a question about supplies. This year I started off by simply
providing the supplies to all students. Of course that didn't work for
long, so
the second half of the year I asked the middle school students to bring in
supplies. That didn't work either. I have heard that they might allow
students to
pick two electives next year, which will be much better. I'm thinking of
making them pay an art fee. How do you handle supplies? Do they pay a fee
at
the beginning of the year? Do you order the supplies before or after the
fee
has been paid? What supplies does each kid get? How do you make sure they
pay?
 Do you keep the supplies in the room somehow? I feel like the best
scenario
would be having cubbies for each student with their supplies. I have over
400 students, so that's really unlikely. I could do it just with the middle

school students, but I'm still looking at over 60 boxes or cubbies. What do
you
do?

Thanks again! :)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: 20th Century American Art texbook
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 10:15:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Greetings Gabrielle,

This book looks like it would be appropriate. You can order an examination =
copy.
Imagining America: Icons of 20th-Century American Art
http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/book.asp?isbn=3D0300109970
book is by John Carlin and Jonathan Fineberg

info on PBS film:
http://www.pbs.org/previews/american_art/

Read some reviews of the book:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0300109970/104-0626561=
-1199954
(O'Keeffe is spelled wrong in the review....)

I found this by entering 20th Century American Art textbook in
Google... You might look and see what else comes up.

Regards,

Judy Decker

On 4/21/06, Gabrielle Bliss wrote:
>
> Hello all,
>
> I am looking for a text for a 20th Century American Art class for High Sc=
hool next year. Is anyone aware of
> anything that would be appropriate?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Prepping for next year
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 09:26:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I had to make a request for students to pay art fees through my
administrator, who then got approval through the school board. So know your
district policy before you go charging fees - you may find yourself in
serious trouble if this is against policy. What I do with my middle
school/high school students - I have adjustable shelves along one wall in my

room. I have each student bring in a shoe box and they keep all supplies in
there, stacked neatly on the shelves. It really doesn't take that much room,

and they keep their area neater, AND supplies don't generally get stolen
with the boxes. I tell them day one that if they want decent scissors they
need to bring their own - I supply CHEAP little metal scissors (these have
lasted over 5 years, as opposed to the better scissors that tend to walk out

the door). I supply students with a paint palette, lid, and two
paintbrushes. They must pay $5 to replace these if they lose them or if they

leave them in the sink and I have to clean them up. Supplies that need
monitored such as X-acto knives - I have a wooden board that I drilled holes

in. I stand the knives in these, and students use as they need. I just don't

let anyone leave the class if there are any empty holes in the board - no
exceptions. I do have a supply list, such as markers, colored pencils,
sharpies - those consumable items that get used up quickly. Larger items,
such as paint and clay I order in large quantities and students use as they
need. I show them how to mix their colors (emphasizing that you put darker
colors into lighter colors to make colors such as pink) and that if they
waste my supplies then they will not get to use them and will have to supply

their own.

As for ordering supplies - my district requires that all supplies be ordered

by the first week of February. This lets them use up any left over money
from this fiscal year. I already have most of next years supplies put away.
My budget is a "use it or lose it" type of deal - what I ordered is all I
get. They will let me order if I run out IF there is money in their general
account, but it's never a sure thing. (And no, there isn't money "stashed"
away - I'm on the negotiating team, so I've looked over the budget and there

really isn't extra money lying around). Art fees must be used exclusively
for consumables - paint, clay, pencils, etc. I cannot use this money for a
book, video, software, etc. All fees are paid to the secretary, and I have
to fill out purchase orders to spend it. She sends out notices to parents
mid-semester. Students can not "check-out" at the end of the school year
until all fees are paid for. We can not legally force them to pay, and
cannot hold their grade card, but most parents pay the fee.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids

> I do have a question about supplies. This year I started off by simply
> providing the supplies to all students. Of course that didn't work for
> long, so
> the second half of the year I asked the middle school students to bring in
> supplies. That didn't work either. I have heard that they might allow
> students to
> pick two electives next year, which will be much better. I'm thinking of
> making them pay an art fee. How do you handle supplies? Do they pay a
> fee at
> the beginning of the year? Do you order the supplies before or after the
> fee
> has been paid? What supplies does each kid get? How do you make sure
> they pay?
> Do you keep the supplies in the room somehow?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: I'm an ART Teacher, not an English teacher
From: berquist <berquist@pa.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 10:30:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

To all who reply to disciplinary weaknesses with "I was taught the
"sandwich method" of "critizing"
(excuse the spelling, I am an ART teacher, not a english teacher)",
please remember that English teachers, principals, etc. may
automatically respond the same way about art. You'll find it difficult
to change perceptions with this approach ;-)

No criticism intended to any specific individuals. I myself often am
tempted to hide my faults and weaknesses (which are MANY!) behind the
"I'm an Art Teacher" mentality.

Respectfully submitted,
BJ Berquist
Art Teacher, Loysville YDC
bjb@tappedin.org

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: still life project online
From: wendy free <wendypaigefree@yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 07:53:15 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

remember when i was begging for FRESH still life
ideas? well, THANKS!!!!!! to you all, i think these
are the best still lifes i've ever gotten from my
students! lots of variety and kids said they loved
the project. the gallery is at
http://www.wendypaigefree.com/ - go to "my students'
art", then 2006 still lifes. i have a power point
that has all the images i showed and directions and
stuff. was hoping i might be able to send it to judy
to have it online for a little while for those
interested?
 
:D wendy

 wendy
www.wendypaigefree.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NAEA Grant and Funding Alert - plus teacher openings
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 12:37:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Dear Art Educators,

I have received this grant funding update (below) from Dr. Hatfield. I
have also updated the Art Teacher Openings page:
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/news/jobs.htm

NAEA GRANT AND FUNDING ALERT
NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
Office of the Executive Director

GRANT AND FUNDING INFORMATION AS OF 4/24/06
Circulated as a public service by the
NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
http://www.naea-reston.org

"2006 All-USA Teacher Team"
USA TODAY is accepting nominations for the 2006 All-USA Teacher Team, a
recognition program for outstanding teachers. Teachers can be
nominated by anyone willing to put in writing why they are
outstanding; nominees must complete the form explaining how they
achieve their success. Maximum Award: $2500.
Eligibility: Teachers K-12. Deadline: April 29, 2006.
http://allstars.usatoday.com

"Seeking Young Heroes for $2,000 Barron Prize"
The Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes seeks nominations for its 2006
awards. The Barron Prize honors young people ages 8 to 18 who have
shown leadership and courage in public service to people and our
planet. Each year, ten
national winners each receive $2,000 to support their service work or highe=
r
education. Nomination deadline is April 30. For more information and
to nominate,
visit:
http://www.barronprize.org/

"The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Young Scholars Program"
This program selects high-achieving youth in the Unites States with financi=
al
need and provides them, throughout their high school years, with
individualized educational services that enable them to develop their
talents and
abilities. Award: funding and support services. Eligibility: students
entering the
eighth grade in the fall of 2006 and planning to enter a U.S. high school w=
ho
also demonstrate financial need. Deadline: May 1, 2006.
http://www.jackkentcookefoundation.org/jkcf_web/content.aspx?page=3DYounSch

"Unsung Heroes Awards Program"
The ING Unsung Heroes awards program recognizes innovative and progressive
thinking in education through monetary awards. Maximum Award: $25,000 to Gr=
and
Prize Winner. Eligibility: full-time educators, teachers, principals,
paraprofessionals, or classified staff members with effective projects
that improve
student learning at an accredited K-12 public or private school.
Deadline: May 1,
2006.
http://www.ing.com/us/aboutING/communityconnections/ineducation/unsungheroe=
s/001137.html

"2006 Butler-Cooley Excellence in Teaching Awards"
The Turnaround Management Association is now accepting nominations for the
2006 Butler-Cooley Excellence in Teaching Awards. The award honors
teachers who have demonstrated exceptional dedication and skill in
shaping the lives of
children and teens through education. Maximum Award: $5,000 cash and travel=
 and
lodging expenses to the TMA Annual Convention in Orlando, Florida, October
11-14, 2006. Eligibility: primary or secondary school teachers employed by
accredited schools for at least five years. Deadline: May 1, 2006.
http://www.turnaround.org/about/awards.asp

Circulated as a public service by the National Art Education Association

"Presidential Freedom Scholarships"
The Presidential Freedom Scholarships promote student service and civic
engagement and honor outstanding service to the community. Maximum Award: $=
1000.
Eligibility: High School Juniors and Seniors with 100 hours of public servi=
ce.
Deadline: May 12, 2006.
http://www.learnandserve.gov/about/programs/pfs.asp

"College Prep Program for High School Juniors"
Questbridge, a non-profit organization dedicated to giving high-achieving
low-income students resources during the college application process, is
accepting applications for its College Prep Program for High School
Juniors. Maximum
Award: full scholarship to summer program, coverage of expenses for college
travel visits, SAT prep course and material, and a new laptop computer.
Eligibility: Qualified low-income High School Juniors. Deadline: May 15, 20=
06.
http://www.questbridge.org/access/collegepreptext/

"Grants to Help Ease the Transition of Students Switching Schools &
Relocating"
The Parent Relocation Council is granting scholarship awards for high schoo=
l
seniors who have demonstrated an ability to overcome difficulties during th=
eir
family's relocation. Awards are based on an essay of up to 500 words and ma=
y
be used to fund tuition, books, school fees, and room and board. Maximum
Award: $2000. Eligibility: High school seniors graduating from school
this academic
year, proceeding to a two- or four-year college, and who have relocated in
the past five years. Deadline: May 15, 2006.
http://www.parentrelocationcouncil.com/scholarship/application.php

"Grants for Early Childhood Education"
The A.L. Mailman Foundation Grants funds projects of national or regional
import in the early childhood field. Maximum Award: $25,000. Eligibility:
501(c)(3) organizations. The Foundation does not consider proposals to supp=
ort
locally focused, direct service projects of organizations such as child car=
e
centers, schools, and professional education programs. Deadline: May 15, 20=
06.
http://www.mailman.org/apply/index.htm

"The Horace Mann Scholarship Program for Educators"
The Horace Mann Scholarship Program for Educators is offering scholarships
for public and private school educators to take college courses. Maximum Aw=
ard:
$5,000. Eligibility: Educators must be employed by a U.S. public or private
school district or U.S. public or private college or university at the time=
 of
application and at the time the scholarship is awarded, and must have at le=
ast
two years teaching experience. Program is not open to residents of Hawaii, =
New
Jersey and New York. Deadline: May 16, 2006.
http://www.horacemann.com/educator-resources/educator-scholarship-program.h=
tml

"NEA Summer Arts Program"
The NEA Summer Arts Program supports rigorous, challenging summer arts
education programs that enable children and youth to acquire knowledge
and skills in the arts as well as gain lifelong interests in the arts
and culture. Maximum
Award: $35,000. Eligibility: 501(c)(3), U.S. organizations; units of state =
or
local government; or federally-recognized tribal communities or tribes. Mus=
t
have a three-year history of providing arts education instruction prior to =
the
application deadline. Deadline: May 22, 2006.
http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/SummerSchools.html

"Target Store Grants for Arts, Reading, and Family Violence Prevention" Tar=
get
Store Grants support local giving in the categories of Arts, Reading, and
Family Violence Prevention. The program awards Reading grants to schools,
libraries, and nonprofit organizations, supporting programs such as weekend=
 book
clubs, after-school reading programs, and events encouraging family
reading time.
Arts grants are given to programs that bring the arts to schools or make it
affordable for families to participate in cultural experiences, such as sch=
ool
touring programs, field trips to the theater or symphony, or artist
residencies and workshops in schools. Family Violence Prevention
grants support groups working to make individual homes and entire
communities safer, such as child abuse counseling programs and
shelters. Maximum Award: $3000. Eligibility:
nonprofit organizations with 501(c)(3) status, schools, or units of governm=
ent.
Deadline: May 31, 2006.
http://sites.target.com/site/en/corporate/page.jsp?contentId=3DPRD03-001818

Circulated as a public service by the National Art Education Association

"Grants for Youth with Disabilities"
The Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation awards Grants for Youth with
Disabilities. The Foundation is dedicated to helping young Americans with
disabilities maximize their potential and full participation in
society. The Foundation
supports organizations and projects within its mission that address importa=
nt
needs, have broad scope and impact, and demonstrate potential for replicati=
on
at other sites. A major program emphasis is inclusion: enabling young peopl=
e
with disabilities to have full access to educational, vocational and
recreational opportunities and to participate alongside their
non-disabled peers.
Maximum Award: Varies. Eligibility: U.S.-based 501(c)(3)
organizations. Deadline:
June 01, 2006.
http://www.meaf.org/apply/

"Recognizing Extraordinary Good Done for Children"
Each year the World of Children presents awards to ordinary people who have
done extraordinary good on behalf of the health, education, and well-being =
of
children. Maximum Award: $50,000. Eligibility: person nominated must have f=
ull
knowledge that he or she is being nominated and must be available in Novemb=
er
to participate in World of Children event held in New York City. Deadline:
June 9, 2006.
http://www.worldofchildren.org/NOMINATE_Selection_process.htm

"Learning in the Arts Grants"
National Endowment for the Arts LEARNING IN THE ARTS FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH
Program offers funding for projects that help children and youth acquire
appreciation, knowledge, and understanding of and skills in the arts.
Projects must
provide participatory learning and engagement of students with skilled
artists, teachers, and excellent art, and ensure the application of
national, state,
or local arts education standards. Maximum Award: $5,000-$150,000.
Eligibility: school-based or community based projects. Deadline: June 12, 2=
006.
http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/GAP07/LearningintheArts.html

"Grants for Education, Health & Fitness, and Arts Education"
The Louis R. Cappelli Foundation makes grants in support of philanthropic
activities with a focus on programs addressing the special needs of youth. =
Three
specific targeted areas where the Foundation focuses its attention are
education, health and fitness, and arts education. Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: 501(c)(3) organizations that serve at-risk youth.
Deadline: June 30, 2006.
http://www.cappelli-inc.com/application.shtml#

"Freedom Alliance Scholarships"
Freedom Alliance Scholarships provide financial assistance to sons and
daughters of soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Guardsman who have
been killed or permanently disabled (100% VA disability rating) in the
line of duty, or who
are currently classified as a Prisoner of War (POW) or Missing in Action
(MIA). Maximum Award: one year scholarships to undergraduates. Eligibility:=
 high
school seniors, high school graduates or registered undergraduate students =
at
an accredited college or post high school vocational/technical institution =
who
are dependent sons or daughters of a soldier, sailor, airman, Marine or
Guardsman who was killed or permanently disabled (100% VA disability
rating) in the line of duty or currently classified as a POW or MIA.=20
Deadline: July 31, 2006.
http://www.freedomalliance.org/scholarship.htm#guidelines

The Surdna Foundation Fellowships to High School Arts Teachers
The Surdna Foundation is pleased to announce the seventh round of the Surdn=
a
Arts Teachers Fellowship Program, a national initiative to support the
artistic revitalization of outstanding arts teachers in specialized,
public arts high
schools. The Surdna Arts Teachers Fellowship Program will enable selected
teachers to create art with professionals in their fields, stay current wit=
h new
practices and resources, and create new bodies of work. Twenty awards of u=
p
to $5,000 each will be made. A complementary grant of $1,500 will be award=
ed
to the Fellow's school to support post-fellowship activities. Letters of In=
tent
to apply are due by November 17, 2006. For more information and application
materials, please go to:
www.surdna.org/artsteachersfellowship

GRANTS WITH NO DEADLINE
Circulated as a public service by the
National Art Education Association

"Grants for Arts, Education, and Health Projects"
The Milagro Foundation seeks grants applications from community-based,
grass-roots organizations that work with underprivileged children and
youth in the
areas of arts, education, and health. Maximum Award: $5000. Eligibility:
501(c)3 organizations in the United States. Deadline: N/A.
http://www.milagrofoundation.org/apply.asp

"Barnes & Noble Corporate Contributions"
Barnes & Noble Corporate Contributions Program is committed to literary-bas=
ed
sponsorships and partners with organizations that focus their core business=
es
on higher learning, literacy and the arts. Maximum Award: varies.
Eligibility: non-profit organizations that focus on literacy, the ARTS
OR EDUCATION (K - 12). Deadline: N/A.
http://www.barnesandnobleinc.com/our_company/sponsorship/sponsorships_natio=
nal/donations_national.html

"Prudential Foundation Ready to Learn Program"
Prudential Foundation Ready to Learn Program for education reform efforts
that strengthen public education at the elementary school level: systemic s=
chool
reform; improving the quality of teachers, principals and other school
leaders, and ARTS EDUCATION; early childhood care and education initiatives=
, and
strategies to improve literacy that address professional development
for teachers,
family literacy programs or literacy in the early years. Maximum Award:
$25,000-$1 million. Eligibility: Public education at the elementary
school level.
Deadline: N/A.
http://www.prudential.com/productsAndServices/0,1474,intPageID%253D1444%252=
6blnPrinterFriendly%253D0,00.html

--------------------------------------------------------

TEACHING ART APPRECIATION

NO. 291
"PATHWAYS TO ART APPRECIATION
A SOURCE BOOK FOR MEDIA & METHODS"

By Al Hurwitz and Stanley S. Madeja with Eldon Katter. Pathways is a source
book for art teachers for the teaching of art appreciation at all levels.
Content strands are carried throughout the book. Each chapter opens
with a general discussion about various approaches to the study of art
related to the
"teaching of art appreciation." Instructional strategies and art activities=
 are
presented in a separate "Things to Do" section. At the close of each chapte=
r,
"Assessment Strategies" that contribute to the teaching of art appreciation=
 are
addressed. Formative and summative assessment activities can be found
throughout the book. Many instructional approaches in the "Things to
Do" strand are dual purpose, being applicable to assessment and to
instruction. This book
accomplishes two goals: to help dispel the unnecessary mystique surrounding=
 art
appreciation, and to clarify the significant ways in which this far-reachin=
g
subject can excite, motivate, and enhance the lives of students. It serves =
as a
resource for the teacher who desires to enhance and expand the teaching of =
art
appreciation in the classroom.
125 pgs. {2003} ISBN 1-890160-24-5
PRICE: $25.00; Members $20.00

Ordering information can be found on NAEA web site
---------------------------------------------------------------
You can sign up on the NAEA web site to receive the newsletter.
http://www.naea-reston.org/
You do not have to be a member to receive the e-news.

Judy Decker

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: I'm an ART Teacher, not an English teacher
From: "Alix Peshette" <apeshet@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 10:06:26 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Hi,
I sometimes excuse my areas of academic weakness by saying "Hey, Liberal
Arts major here!" I think (hope) that it infers a wide range of
knowledge in the more classical forms of education.

Maybe I'm delusional.

-Alix

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Charging a lab fee in the art and computer arts classroom
From: "Alix Peshette" <apeshet@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 10:49:43 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

Hi,
When I was in the classroom as an art teacher and later as a computer
arts teacher, I had lab fees. The lab fee for the nine week class was
$5 and the semester class was $10. I also had a small department budget
to start the year.

Legally, in my district (in California) lab fees can only be charged for
supplies/projects that are taken home by the student. Also, there must
be a statement in the class syllabus that students and family who can't
afford the fee can request the lab fee from the "helping hands" fund
(funded by the PTA) In reality, I just waived the art fee for the kids
who needed it.

My district went from the once-a-year huge buy of art materials (which
sat in the district warehouse and dried out) to buy-on-demand ordering
as needed (through Office Depot with a 40% discount) This turned out to
be a much better way. I didn't need to find all the money at once and I
could adjust what I needed throughout the school year.

For the art classes, students saved work in portfolios, and as a final
project, took the portfolio home to do a portfolio review with the
parent or guardian. The porfolio review (I had a list of questions) was
returned signed by both the student and parent. That way the portfolio
made it home and was much more appreciated.

In the computer arts classes, I charged the same fee and used it to buy
glossy photographic paper, brochure paper, cardstock, ink for the color
inkjet printer and CD's for the student portfolios. Students could bring
home projects such as digital art, gift tags, Valentine and Mother's
Day cards etc. I timed these projects to go home around Open House and
holidays and often would print out extras for the kids.

I off-set the expense of color ink for the inkjet printer by purchasing
it on EBay (Dutch auctions). Where I would have to pay $25 for a black
cartridge and $32 for color through Office Depot (no discount on ink), I
could buy black for $2-4 and color for $4-8 on EBay! My district would
reimburse me for up to $50 with a receipt, so I made sure the purchases
(including shipping) came in under the $50 mark.

As for the mechanics of collecting the art fees...
There was a statement in the syllabus about having the check made out to
the school or bringing cash. As the art fees came in, I had a supply of
small white envelopes, a pen and a basket stationed next to my desk.
Students were directed to write their name and class period on the
envelop, put the lab fee in, seal the envelop and put it in the basket.
I kept an eye on the basket and at the end of the period grabbed the
envelopes and put a rubber band around them and stashed them away until
I could do the paperwork process.

Having kids put their name and period on the envelope took care of the
problem of checks from parents or guardians with different last names
from the students.

The system worked pretty well and my principal (who was a legal eagle)
was assured that we were in compliance with the rules.

Just my 2 cents worth...

-Alix
Alix E. Peshette
Technology Training Specialist
Davis Joint Unified School District

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Charging a lab fee in the art and computer arts classroom
From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 14:07:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

I don't charge an art fee, but I do require the students to purchase
an "art kit." They can either buy the kit already put together at a
local art store (they give a big discount on these), or they can put
the kit together with things they already have or buy at the dollar
store.

I do purchase some of the contents (colored pencils, crayons, markers,
etc... all the products you use up, really) for those who don't bring
their own, but you know how community art supplies go -- within a few
weeks, you're left with stubs and dried-up markers. Usually kids who
didn't buy their kits the first time around will start bringing their
own supplies, after all, so they won't have to use them. It's not a
huge investment, and they get to keep their supplies.

They also have art lockers so they can keep their supplies locked up
in the art room. This has been GREAT, and I'm so fortunate that the
school gave us the old gym lockers when they upgraded. A few cans of
Lysol and they were good to go! :)

Becky
Charleston WV

On 4/22/06, Alix Peshette <apeshet@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> Hi,
> When I was in the classroom as an art teacher and later as a computer
> arts teacher, I had lab fees. The lab fee for the nine week class was
> $5 and the semester class was $10. I also had a small department budget
> to start the year.
>
> Legally, in my district (in California) lab fees can only be charged for
> supplies/projects that are taken home by the student. Also, there must
> be a statement in the class syllabus that students and family who can't
> afford the fee can request the lab fee from the "helping hands" fund
> (funded by the PTA) In reality, I just waived the art fee for the kids
> who needed it.
>
> My district went from the once-a-year huge buy of art materials (which
> sat in the district warehouse and dried out) to buy-on-demand ordering
> as needed (through Office Depot with a 40% discount) This turned out to
> be a much better way. I didn't need to find all the money at once and I
> could adjust what I needed throughout the school year.
>
> For the art classes, students saved work in portfolios, and as a final
> project, took the portfolio home to do a portfolio review with the
> parent or guardian. The porfolio review (I had a list of questions) was
> returned signed by both the student and parent. That way the portfolio
> made it home and was much more appreciated.
>
> In the computer arts classes, I charged the same fee and used it to buy
> glossy photographic paper, brochure paper, cardstock, ink for the color
> inkjet printer and CD's for the student portfolios. Students could bring
> home projects such as digital art, gift tags, Valentine and Mother's
> Day cards etc. I timed these projects to go home around Open House and
> holidays and often would print out extras for the kids.
>
> I off-set the expense of color ink for the inkjet printer by purchasing
> it on EBay (Dutch auctions). Where I would have to pay $25 for a black
> cartridge and $32 for color through Office Depot (no discount on ink), I
> could buy black for $2-4 and color for $4-8 on EBay! My district would
> reimburse me for up to $50 with a receipt, so I made sure the purchases
> (including shipping) came in under the $50 mark.
>
> As for the mechanics of collecting the art fees...
> There was a statement in the syllabus about having the check made out to
> the school or bringing cash. As the art fees came in, I had a supply of
> small white envelopes, a pen and a basket stationed next to my desk.
> Students were directed to write their name and class period on the
> envelop, put the lab fee in, seal the envelop and put it in the basket.
> I kept an eye on the basket and at the end of the period grabbed the
> envelopes and put a rubber band around them and stashed them away until
> I could do the paperwork process.
>
> Having kids put their name and period on the envelope took care of the
> problem of checks from parents or guardians with different last names
> from the students.
>
> The system worked pretty well and my principal (who was a legal eagle)
> was assured that we were in compliance with the rules.
>
> Just my 2 cents worth...
>
> -Alix
> Alix E. Peshette
> Technology Training Specialist
> Davis Joint Unified School District
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Value and texture
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 16:16:42 EDT
X-Message-Number: 11

Hi guys,

I'm trying to figure out the rest of the nine weeks.

My students are finishing up a value project next week. Unfortunately, not
many students really "got it." This nine weeks I've been basing my projects

around the elements of art. For example, they learned about line and made
line
studies. Some came out pretty nice. Then they learned about shape and had
fun with Op Art. Then they learned about color and enjoyed the edible color

wheel. A quick lesson on Matisse inspired some really nice collages in
which
they used line, shape and color. They had to select a color scheme, use
some
collage items and were allowed to use any other materials available to
create
their still life collages. So far, this project has been most successful.

My next lesson was on value. I briefly discussed crosshatching and value,
made a pretty good handout and had them practice shading a value strip.
From
there, I gave them a choice of project. I did a quick lesson on Surrealism
and
Salvador Dali and allowed them to either create a surreal collage from
magazine images and then use a grid to produce a value drawing, or they
could select
a nice image from a magazine and cut out only part of it so they could draw
the other half any way they liked. I keep stressing that they need to
notice
the lights and darks and values in between. I told them they could use
drawing
pencils or colored pencils but should layer their colors and use the
crosshatching technique. I know that ideally, I would have had them work
from black
and white photos only, but I really didn't have the resources available to
do
this.

Some students seem to get the idea, but many do not. Since I really can't
get the kids to listen for even five minutes, instruction has become very
brief.
 I try to help those who want the help and kind of let the others just
produce subpar work. I'm wondering if next year I should leave out value?
I'd
rather find a much more interesting and easier way to teach it to kids with
no
drawing experience. It's so hard to keep their attention, and then they
complain
that they don't understand. How do I keep their attention long enough to
get
them to understand?

My second question is that I want to move onto texture and perspective next.

Originally I was thinking of having them make textured squares of paper...by

painting and dragging items through the paint, or by adding things to the
squares. Then they would cut up the squares to make cool collages of
musical
instruments. I would tie this lesson into a lesson on Romare Bearden. Now
I'm
not sure it's a good idea. Any thoughts? For perspective, I love Mike
Sacco's
lesson with connectors, but I'm worried that this stuff is going to be too
hard for them?

For form, I'd like to finish off the semester with paper mache masks. I
have
a feeling the mask project will go well, so I'm not too worreid about that
one.

I really want to keep the kids interested through these final weeks and
would
love for them to feel proud of their work.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Charging a lab fee in the art and computer arts clas...
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 16:23:05 EDT
X-Message-Number: 12

Thanks, great ideas. I'm going to get together a whole proposal for next
year and discuss it with my administration.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: still life project online
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 16:29:40 EDT
X-Message-Number: 13

Oh, I absolutely love them! I'd love more information on how you went about

your lesson! My kids just did some collage Matisse-inspired still lifes,
but
I love the cubism idea.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Value and texture
From: Ann Heineman <aiheineman@prodigy.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2006 17:05:42 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14

Hi Stacie,
    Here is a lesson my 5th graders enjoyed. It meant a little outlay of m=
y
own funds at the grocery store. I called it the "Giant Cookie" lesson. I
selected a number of bags of cookies that have a relief sculptural pattern.
They come in vanilla or chocalate and have a thin filling. Each student go=
t
a cookie and was told the time to eat it was AFTER they did the drawing. :-=
)
I used a 9 or 12 inch square of manila paper. They started out with a
medium range color of chalk and rubbed it smooth into the outline of the
cookie they had drawn on the paper with white/light colored chalk. The
cookie was on a small piece of paper on the table beside the student. I
turned out a row of lights so that the highlights were more obvious. (If yo=
u
have some magnefying lenses, and/or spotlights, they can help the students
with their observations.) Then I demonstrated to them how to squint to see
the light edges of the ridges and to do these in the lighter colored chalk.
Then we looked for the shadow patterns and we did these in the darkest
values. The challenge was to make the cookie look almost like a "trompe
l'oeil" (trick/fool the eye, en fran=E7ais) painting! We would do the
background in a complementary flat color. If you bring in some samples of
Dutch realist paintings, the students may find a number of insects and othe=
r
critters within their very detailed still lifes. It may appeal to a middle
schooler's zany sense of hunor to incorporate some critters in their value
drawings and make the critters bigger than life as well. Maybe some of you=
r
students have an insect collection they can bring in for a resource.

                        Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus
                        Art teacher, K-5, retired
   =20

> My next lesson was on value. I briefly discussed crosshatching and value=
,
> made a pretty good handout and had them practice shading a value strip. =
From
> there, I gave them a choice of project.=20

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