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[teacherartexchange] Horse Sculptures - Lesson plan to come

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From: Judy Decker (judy.decker_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Apr 10 2006 - 07:31:33 PDT


Dear Art Educators,

I am looking for horse sculptures to link to a lesson plan.

Thought I would share the links I find now (just in case the images
are no longer available by the time I get the lesson written). The
lesson will include links to Deborah Butterfield (those links were
posted previously)

Bronze cast Stick Horse - Butterfield
http://www.washburn.edu/cas/art/cyoho/archive/MidwestTravel/AKmuseum/
http://www.washburn.edu/cas/art/cyoho/archive/MidwestTravel/AKmuseum/Horse.jpg

Rita Dee - driftwood horse sculpture:
http://www.abouttownguide.com/dutchess/articles/summer02/drift_horses.shtml

Driftwood horse sculpture by Heather Jansch.
http://www.waynevisser.com/Graphics/eden_horse.jpg
http://www.cyberelk.net/sue/gallery/eden/aab

Bettye Hamblin Turner - horse sculptures:
http://www.tsos.org/hamblenturner.htm

Esther Benedict Sculptures:
http://www.estherbenedict.com/horses.htm

Here is a neat Japanese horse made from earthenware - hollow cylinders
form the horse:
http://www.museum.cornell.edu/HFJ/permcoll/asia/asia_jap.html
Japan, Kofun Period (ca.AD 250 - ca. 600) Haniwa Horse

Here is a contemporary version (this artist sells copies of ancient
ceramic artifacts)
http://www.ancientimage.com/42.htm

Straw Horse - from India:
http://www.theculturedtraveler.com/Museums/Archives/SantaFe_FolkArt.htm
I was looking for the ancient straw horses from Japan... I had a print
of one (It looks much like this horse)

Two contemporary straw horses (Belarus)
http://www.solard.com/eng/services_for/prom.htm

Straw horse - from Ukraine (scroll down)
http://www.artukraine.com/primitive/narmyst.htm

Straw Horse - Japan:
Wara-uma (Straw Horse)
http://www.marubeni.com/shosha/wsvj65.html
"Although they have almost become folk toys, wara-uma and wara-ningyo,
or straw-made dolls, used to have religious functions as symbols to
ward off evil and bring good luck. Use was unique to each region. Some
people used them in prayers to drive off a child's disease. In other
regions, people considered wara-uma as a good omen. They would put it
on the doorstep on New Year's eve and when they found it New Year's
morning they would worship it as a god. Wara-uma take various shapes
according to the region, and the one pictured above is carrying an ear
of rice on its back." (not a high quality image)

These are just a few of the hundreds of horse sculpture images you can
find on line.

Lesson Plan will feature Sue Stevens' stick horses... and will list
alternate lesson ideas.

Regards,

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

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