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Re: [teacherartexchange] help with narrative painting research

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From: Su Doman (sudoman_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Apr 06 2006 - 17:37:23 PDT


Hi Teresa,
      Take a look at the research of "Visual Thinking Strategies" (VTS)
by Abigail Housen and Phillip Yenawine. I had training at The Detroit
Institute of Arts in Michigan more than 5 years ago. They presented at
the National Art Education Association conference in Chicago in March.
They have conducted more research with VTS and how it impacts the
development of writing. I think you can contact them through VUE
(Visual Understanding in Education) which is based in New York
City..Good luck, Su in Michigan
On Apr 6, 2006, at 1:03 PM, TERESA NOGUERA wrote:

> Dear all,
>
> My name is Teresa Noguera, I am an MPhil/PhD student
> at Brunel University in London (England) and I am
> writing to you as I would like to ask for your help,
> advice and/or opinion. I am new to this discussion
> group and I am not quite sure how the system works. In
> addition, I am quite computer illiterate, so I would
> like to apologize beforehand should my ICT
> incompetence inconvenience any of you, it is not my
> intention to do that.
>
> My research aims to investigate the effect of
> narrative painting training on children?s (Yr 3, 7-8
> year olds) conceptualization of narrative content and
> form/structure. Amongst the (initial/tentative)
> objectives of the research are:
> To examine children?s views of narrative
> To investigate children?s decision making processes
> and the rationale behind their choices on narrative
> content and form (structure).
> To examine possible differences and similarities
> between children?s choices and rationale.
> To investigate if narrative painting has any effect in
> children?s decision-making processes (and/or
> narratives)
> To explore the effect(s) and to identify factors for
> it.
>
> I was wondering if you would be so kind as to help me
> by guiding me to narrative paintings/painters that I
> could use in my research to teach children about
> narrative painting, books/websites with ideas/lessons
> on how to teach narrative painting/the elements of
> painting and art that I could use to plan my lessons,
> sharing with me your thoughts/experiences on the
> following:
> How do you go about composing/creating your artwork?
> What kind of decisions do you make? What is the
> rationale behind those decisions/choices? Are these
> choices any similar/different to the choices you would
> make were you to compose/create a piece of work in a
> different medium (e.g. written, oral?)?
> Are your choices based/influenced, in any way, on your
> knowledge, skill and expertise on the medium (and its
> elements)? Would your choices be different if your
> knowledge, skill and expertise were greater/lesser?
> How? Why? (I do hope this makes sense to you)
>
> I would also be most grateful if you shared your
> opinions regarding my research, I do appreciate and
> value constructive criticism.
>
> Thanking you in advance for taking the time to read
> this, and looking forward to your comments and
> suggestions.
>
> Yours truly,
>
> Teresa Noguera
>
>
>
> --- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
>
>> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, April 05,
>> 2006.
>>
>> 1. NOVICA - Bali and Java - Animal Themes Masks
>> great pictures for teaching resource
>> 2. Illuminated Middle Ages
>> 3. Re:printmaking
>> 4. Re: non-chemical printmaking
>> 5. Pysanky Eggs - How to from Sue Stevens
>> 6. Re: Pysanky Eggs - How to from Sue Stevens
>> 7. NEW! "ATCs in the Classroom" - site by Craig
>> Roland
>> 8. Re: Pysanky Eggs - How to from Sue Stevens
>> 9. Why did I leave?
>>
>>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: NOVICA - Bali and Java - Animal Themes
>> Masks great pictures for teaching resource
>> From: "Christine Besack" <mrsbeeswax@comcast.net>
>> Date: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 07:11:56 -0400
>> X-Message-Number: 1
>>
>> Hi All, Here are some great Balinese mask images
>> from Novica's website.
>>
>>
>>
> http://www.novica.com/region/bali-and-java/masks/index.cfm?
> rID=10&scid=804
>>
>> Descriptions accompany the image and there is a
>> picture of the artist and an
>> artist's statement.
>>
>> Hope this helps,
>> Christine Besack :)
>>
>>
>>
>>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Illuminated Middle Ages
>> From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
>> Date: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 04:20:49 -0700 (PDT)
>> X-Message-Number: 2
>>
>> You probably already know this symbol, but I didn't.
>> Yesterday in my art history class we were on and
>> around p 180 of Gombrich's The Story of Art. 16th
>> edition, 1995. There is an angel in an illumination
>> on
>> that page: 'From a Swabian gospel manuscript??'
>> Anyway, in it, Gabriel has his hand raised and first
>> two fingers curved a little but mostly extended
>> toward
>> Mary. This is a hand sign I have seen dozens of
>> times
>> in Midieval art. I hope you can picture it. I never
>> knew its meaning. But Gombrich explained the meaning
>> to me for the first time: 'I am speaking'.
>> I have of course transfered this useful tool to all
>> my
>> classes--a hand raised toward them in this certain
>> traditional way means that I am about to speak. We
>> had
>> a good laugh but I hope to keep using it.
>> I found two examples for you, the first one being
>> exactly like the one from the book.
>> Beth H
>>
> http://hl2.biu.ac.il/users/www/23078/22Ren/Pictures%20Stock/
> 06bRen028.jpg
>>
> http://hl2.biu.ac.il/users/www/23078/22Ren/Pictures%20Stock/
> Cossa1470.jpg
>>
>> __________________________________________________
>> Do You Yahoo!?
>> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
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>>
>>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Re:printmaking
>> From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
>> Date: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 15:58:37 GMT
>> X-Message-Number: 3
>>
>> wow, sounds like you have managed allot with this
>> group! I have a coupl=
>> e of small suggestions that have been successful
>> with multiple age and a=
>> bility levels allowing success for those less
>> experienced and open enoug=
>> h for students to take risks, push it further....
>>
>> *use balsa wood for wood block prints- it is soft
>> and students can easil=
>> y use a hammer to gently pound a nut or bolt, etc to
>> create impressions =
>> for designs, patterns, etc
>>
>> *draw on acetate with permanent marker (could be
>> overlaid on mirror for =
>> portrait, against the window for landscape...)have
>> students "fill in" fo=
>> r monotype (versus monoprint) -this year we used
>> the leftover acetate o=
>> ver the top of a drawing for a layered mixed media
>> piece
>> for video clip
>>
> http://americanart.si.edu/collections/exhibits/monotypes/video4.html
>>
>> *use washable markers on acetate-could use original
>> drawing underneath t=
>> o guide
>>
>> *use wet media mylar, thin white plastic sheeting or
>> other cut to size f=
>> or the plate-use scraps, stickers, etc to develop
>> the original-coat with=
>> a release agent-when dry apply ink and print on
>> damp paper
>>
>> *use same plate material as above-add release
>> agent-when dry use water s=
>> oluble drawing materials (watercolor crayons, oil
>> pastels) then print on=
>> damp paper =
>>
>>
>> *chine coll=E9 - embossing - my, my seems I am all
>> inspired by this myse=
>> lf - maybe we need to do some printmaking in class
>> soon :-) !!
>>
>> let us know what students end up working on~
>> creatively, Linda in Oregon
>>
>>
>>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Re: non-chemical printmaking
>> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
>> Date: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 14:39:04 -0400
>> X-Message-Number: 4
>>
>> Greetings Claire and all,
>>
>> Carborundum prints are neat. You can even use water
>> base block
>> printing ink for them. Just spray the plate lightly
>> with Pam before
>> inking. To make a carborundum print - mix a fine
>> grade with acrylic
>> medium. I used a medium fine (don't remember the
>> grit now). I put the
>> mix in small squeeze bottles and the students drew
>> their image onto
>> the Plexiglas. They put their drawing under the
>> plate. I did this with
>> high school and with seventh grade (seventh grade
>> did portraits - and
>> could even put the actual photocopy of person under
>> the plate if they
>> wished - this really helped those who were not as
>> confident with
>> drawing). We did monoprint colors on one print -
>> painting the plate
>> with Createx and printing over the black print This
>> had to be done on
>> an oil base print since the paper had to be soaked
>> again). We also did
>> Chine colle - place tissue paper on the inked plate
>> - dusting lightly
>> with powdered wheat paste (that is what I had) -
>> then placing damp
>> paper and running through press. Student also had
>> the option of hand
>> coloring a print with watercolors.
>>
>> You can spread the mix with a brush - and can scrape
>> section with
>> those rubber nibbed tools (with angled end and
>> pointed end).
>>
>> When completely dry - ink intaglio style and print
>> on etching press
>> with damp paper. We started using the oil base
>> etching ink but ran
>> out. I found the block printing ink worked just as
>> good (and clean up
>> sure went faster).
>>
>> I have a lesson plan for this method that I will get
>> on Incredible Art
>> Department soon.
>>
>> I had success using water base block printing ink to
>> print Plexiglas
>> engravings too. You can make simple engraving tools
>> with nails and
>> dowel rods.
>>
>> Judy Decker
>>
> === message truncated ===
>
>
>
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