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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: April 03, 2006

---------

From: Claire d'Anthes (cdanthes_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Apr 04 2006 - 21:11:34 PDT


Hello,
I've gotten so many good ideas from your discussions I thought that I
would ask for help with a current issue.
My district no longer offers Art I, II, etc., at the high school level.
  We teach one year courses in specific art forms such as Drawing,
Sculpture, Painting, etc. The other high schools in the district have
prerequisites but my school does not. This preserves jobs, for which I
am eternally grateful, but I end up with an especially challenging mix
of ability and experience in my year-long Printmaking class. tt's
always a much wider range than in any other course I teach - in
college, students would have to pass Drawing and Design before taking
Printmaking. My drawing students are off the charts this year, but the
counselors have no idea what printmaking is, (I'm working on this), we
have no general art, I am sympathetic to the S.E. population, and the
options for non-artist students looking for a hands-on art class to
fulfill requirements are limited. Let's just say that I have a
substantial # of kids who can barely draw stick figures, a lot of
average kids, a few talented beginners who've heard about the class
from last year and want to experiment, some of my former studnets, and
few students who are in A.P. On the bright side, Printmaking is a fun
class to teach because I like to experiment with materials and so do
the students, and because they don't have to be able to draw super well
to make a successful print. They are an extremely fun and enthusiastic
group, but getting them to pay attention to multi-step directions, take
creative chances, and pay attention to craftsmanship is a friendly
battle. They do best with very structured lessons, but I am trying to
keep them from copying (their crutch).

I'm working on two things, incorporating more drawing and design
activities into the curriculum - to help the students and to stretch my
miniscule budget, and I need a few more project ideas that can be done
without chemicals. I usually teach the technique, suggest a theme
suitable to it, provide samples and visuals, but allow students to
choose their own subject if it works for the problem at hand. To date,
we have made glue-line prints and foil embossings, dot prints, string
prints, tagboard layer prints, regular linocuts, linocuts printed over
collage, color reduction linocuts, paper cuts, styrofoam prints with
shapes and incised textures, stenciled posters, silkscreen T-shirts,
and embossed clay tiles. I usually have them hand-color some
impressions. Currently we are working on accordion-fold memory books,
and I plan to make paste paper and bind notebooks and make layered
prints from corrugated cardboard. I need two or three more projects.
I have tried collographs and monotypes in the past, but my students are
generally unsophisticated and even after seeing examples of abstract
prints and fiber art, they just don't relate. These projects become
"goof-off time" and "anything goes". If you have a structured lesson
in either medium that would be really helpful. A structured lesson in
abstraction would be especially great. Ideas for quilt lessons or
something to do with commercial rubber stamps would be good. I hope to
buy drypoint needles, woodcut gouges, and solar etching equipment in
the future but it won't be for this year.

Lastly, does anyone know of a good summer Printmaking workshop in the
West that focusses on non-chemical methods?

Thanks for all the great, life-saving ideas that I have gotten from
this group and from Judy Decker's site.

Claire
cdanthes@verizon.net

On Apr 4, 2006, at 1:01 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
wrote:

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, April 03, 2006.
>
> 1. Diane Kurzyna curates "Java Divas: Art about Coffee"
> 2. NAEA Publication "Instant Art Instant Culture..." PLUS Job Openings
> 3. American Visionary ARt Museum - Baltimore
> 4. Golden Mean Lesson Plan (HS) from Grace Hall
> 5. Re: summer job
> 6. Re: seeking information
> 7. Re: ceramic bell
> 8. barbie doll show: judy
> 9. Re: Re:ceramic bell
> 10. Re: questions about linocuts
> 11. Re: questions about linocuts
> 12. The art show...
> 13. Re: questions about linocuts
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Diane Kurzyna curates "Java Divas: Art about Coffee"
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 10:01:55 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Dear TeacherArtExchange Members,
>
> Diane Kurzyna (list member) - informed me about a new exhibit.
>
> Here is the link about Diane Kurzyna's latest art activity (She
> curated this art show about coffee):
>
> http://www.theolympian.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=3D/20060402/
> LIVING/604=
> 02013/1004
>
> From Diane:
>
> JAVA DIVAS
> Art about Coffee
>
> by two dozen artists from the Puget Sound area
> at South Puget Sound Community College Gallery
>
> April 3 - May 5
>
> opening reception Friday, April 7, 7pm - 9pm
> gallery talk on Thursday, April 20, noon
> closing party on Friday, May 5, 4pm - 6pm
>
> This ain't yesterday's coffee art! This art has been specially
> blended and freshly brewed for your enjoyment.
>
> In conjunction with SPSCC's Coffee Conference, the Gallery is proud to
> serve Java Divas, an exhibit featuring a wide array of interpretations
> to the theme of coffee. From Ross Palmer Beecher's recycled media to
> Greg Lukens allegorical oil paintings, from Sequoia Miller's
> functional ceramics to Nikki McClure's papercut logos, see how over
> two dozen artists from the Puget Sound area, including Tacoma's own
> Lynn Di Nino, have created art about coffee with coffee beans, coffee
> cups, coffee filters, coffee grinds, coffee pots, coffee sacks, even
> coffee as the medium itself, through painting, sculpture, collage,
> encaustics, prints, photographs, felt, and more. The NW premier of
> "Coffee Duet" performance art video by Lydia Grey with Hilliard
> Greene from NYC will also be shown.
>
> South Puget Sound Community College Gallery
>
> Kenneth J. Minnaert Center for the Arts
>
> 2011 Mottman Rd SW
> Olympia, WA 98512
> ----------------------------------------------------------------
> For those of you who do not remember Diane's fun recycled art - here
> are some links:
>
> This shows White Bread Boy:
> http://www.arts.wa.gov/progAIE/roster/visualArtists/visKurzynaD.html
>
> the shows Wonderful Me/Wonderful You and Portrait of the Artist:
> http://artsballard.org/content/view/157
>
> White Trash Wedding exhibit:
> http://www.thefalcononline.com/story/2681
>
> This shows Wonder Woman:
> http://www.thevisibletrashsociety.net/
>
> Looks like a favorite of Diane's is the Wonder Bread bags - great
> stuff!
>
> Enjoy!
>
> Judy Decker
> Incredible Art Department
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> Incredible Art Resources
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: NAEA Publication "Instant Art Instant Culture..." PLUS Job
> Openings
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 10:23:55 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> NAEA has republished this popular book by Laura Chapman.
>
> NEW FROM NAEA
>
> Order No. 247
>
> INSTANT ART, INSTANT CULTURE: THE UNSPOKEN POLICY FOR AMERICAN SCHOOLS
>
> By Laura H. Chapman.
>
> Chapman critically examines the reasons for the token educational
> programs
> many schools offer in all the arts, including music, dance, and
> theater, bu=
> t
> with particular emphasis on the visual arts. She writes with
> conviction on=
> the
> importance of effecting change in attitudes and school practices that
> actua=
> lly
> prevent many children from studying arts on a regular basis. Chapman
> devote=
> s
> much of the book to providing suggestions for improving school
> instruction =
> in
> the arts.
>
> Among the topics covered are: What should be taught in an arts program
> and
> who should teach it; why a school curriculum should include the arts,
> scie=
> nces,
> and humanities as core subjects for all students; how to improve
> teacher
> education programs; what models for change have been suggested by
> various panels and federal groups, and how effective they would be.
>
> Order No. 247
> Instant Art, Instant Culture:
> The Unspoken Policy for American Schools
>
> 224 pgs. (Reprinted 2005) ISBN 0-8077-2722-9
> $25.00; Member Price $20.00
>
> WEB ORDER FORMS:
> http://www.naea-reston.org/publications
>
> I know I posted this before - just never added it to a page in IAD. It
> is now listed on the Jobs page:
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/news/jobs.htm
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Art Teacher Openings - Selected States:
>
> Many popular NAEA publications are listed on the Art Teacher Openings
> -Selected States page:
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/news/jobs.htm
> Dr. Hatfield sends me updates for this page a few times a month. I
> don't always post the updates to the list.
>
> Judy Decker
> Incredible Art Department
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> Incredible Art Resources
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: American Visionary ARt Museum - Baltimore
> From: maggie at AVAM <maggie@avam.org>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 11:08:06 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> hi everyone. pls ck out our website: www.avam.org, for great teacher
> resources and downloads. also, a listing of our weekend workshops -
> which many teachers take. this saturday, april 8, we have a visiting
> artists from parsons school of design teaching 2 bookmaking workshops.
>
>
> Maggie Muth
> Education Coordinator
> American Visionary ARt Museum
> 410-244-1900x232
> maggie@avam.org
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Golden Mean Lesson Plan (HS) from Grace Hall
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 12:43:24 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> Grace Hall sent me a great lesson plan using the Golden Mean and
> Nature abstraction.
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/high/Grace-golden.htm
> There is a link to her PowerPoint and overhead transparencies, too.
>
> Grace did this with high school - but I think you could adapt it to
> middle school. This lesson integrates math and science.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
> Incredible Art Department
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> Incredible Art Resources
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: summer job
> From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
> Date: Mon, 03 Apr 2006 12:15:49 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> I worked one summer as a maintenance person--I painted one whole
> school. =
> It was really
> hard work, but pleasant conditions and I got in good with the head of =
> maintenance which
> has given me some great perks.
>
>>>> elizhiz@yahoo.com 04/01/06 5:30 PM >>>
> Would anyone share summer job ideas you have enjoyed
> in the past? Soon we will have two in college...Trying
> to brainstorm more creatively.
> Beth H
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around=20
> http://mail.yahoo.com=20
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to=20
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: seeking information
> From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
> Date: Mon, 03 Apr 2006 12:19:46 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Several years ago at a NAEA conference in NYC we visited
> the FIT (Fashion Inst. of Tech??). It was really interesting--
> graphic design, dressmaking etc. You could try to contact
> them directly.
>
>>>> desubhade@yahoo.co.in 04/02/06 12:49 AM >>>
>
> I have just received an invitation to participate in
> Art Retreat -Confluence 2006 which will be held in New
> York city from May 26 to June 6th this year. The
> gallery would want us to participate in
> various events. I am planning to request them to let
> me off at some point to visit schools and observe
> the classroom layout,materials available and ofcourse
> the teaching instrutions. I am very keen
> to do this . Could you please suggest a school
> or a person whom I can write to . Any
> relevant information is most welcome. This will be
> my first visit to U.S and I sure would try and pick up
> as much teaching resources as possible.=20
> Subha De
>
>
>
>
> =09
> __________________________________________________________=20
> Yahoo! India Matrimony: Find your partner now. Go to
> http://yahoo.shaadi.co=
> m=20
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to=20
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: ceramic bell
> From: Fran Legman <flegman@comcast.net>
> Date: Mon, 03 Apr 2006 16:44:52 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Can anyone give me advice (elementary school) on making ceramic bells?
> I
> made a sample out of a pinch pot, but I don't know the best way for
> attaching the bead (ringer) and the handle on top. Thanks, Fran in NJ
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: barbie doll show: judy
> From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 14:29:56 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> Thanks again, Judy, for the link to the NY Times. I am
> still getting the art dispatches. I think these are
> great. I had a kid tell me today that my class is the
> only one where he is learning anything. Had not heard
> this in about...well...not in a long time!!
> We are at a HS in Columbus and in the NYT on April 2
> was an article about the Barbie show downtown right
> here at our own palace theater. Barbie is a kind of
> Sesame Street Live type thing where the toys come to
> life and children enjoy once again believing their
> toys are real.
> Actually one of my AP students was at this show
> yesterday!
> We talked about whether the Barbie influence is good,
> bad or lasting. How she intrudes on my life when I
> don't like how i look.
> We talked about how much Mattell has to gain (8
> million, I think the article stated.)
> Anyway, a very good day. A very relevant day. Judy,
> you and this group have made my job so much more
> interesting and fulfilling. For me and for my students
> as well.
> Beth H
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Re:ceramic bell
> From: "Amy Broady" <AmyBroady@alumni.duke.edu>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 18:21:41 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Fran, I am afraid that I do not have any tried-and-tue advice for you,
> but
> your message has inspired me, and I think this is what I am looking
> for in
> order to do a simple yet striking clay project with my 3rd graders.
>
> I will probably use airdry clay.
>
> I will teach the kids how to make pinch pots (I do not know if they
> have had
> that before, as I am new to my school), and I think we will probably
> insert
> eye screws into the bottom for attaching the ringer.
>
> I will have them create a custom handle separate, and then score and
> slip to
> attach, reinforced by coils that they will turn into a decorative
> element on
> the outer surface of the pinch pot.
>
> We will paint them, I'm guessing we'll use acrylics.
>
> We can maybe tie it in with the science of sound, and have the students
> explore what makes the tone of the bell different and how (i.e.
> thickness of
> the pinch pot, size of the ringer ball, etc.).
>
> Ooh--this sounds fun! I think the kids will love it!
>
> I am eager to hear any advice from you, since you have at least made a
> sample, and from others, too.
>
> Good luck! Wish me the same,
> Amy2
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: questions about linocuts
> From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 15:51:29 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> I use the same type of linoleum blocks from Sax that
> you mention in your questions. Here is what I have
> found: Older linoleum needs to be warmed before
> carving, because I believe there is linseed oil in the
> linoleum compound that drys out over time. I use a
> heat gun set on low heat and it seems to work well,
> even on linoleum that is several years old.
>
> As far as printing goes, you really need to
> "condition" your printing ink before attempting to
> print with it. It is a bit hard to explain, but
> basically I roll a line of ink onto a sheet of glass
> or plexiglass. You have to roll the ink until it
> becomes "tacky", which you can discern by the look and
> sound of the ink as you roll the brayer over it.
> Experience will tell you what to look for, but the
> texture of the ink looks even and the sound of the
> brayer becomes louder as the ink dries slightly. You
> have to roll the ink on the linoleum very evenly or
> the print comes out uneven. I do not use printing
> presses or barens--just have the kids use the pads of
> their fingers to rub the ink onto the paper surface,
> then pull the print. Speaking of paper, use a paper
> that has a fine texture, not rough or coarse in any
> way, or the ink will lift small amounts of the paper
> fiber and give the print a speckled look. I use black
> ink printed on cut-up fadeless art paper, which makes
> great colorful prints. I also have kids make test
> prints made on typing paper, which has a similar
> texture.
>
> Hope this helps, Jerry
>
>
>
>
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: questions about linocuts
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 17:33:49 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
>
> On Apr 3, 2006, at 4:51 PM, Jerry Vilenski wrote:
>
> Jerry gives excellent advice:
>
>> Older linoleum needs to be warmed before
>> carving, because I believe there is linseed oil in the
>> linoleum compound that drys out over time. I use a
>> heat gun set on low heat and it seems to work well,
>> even on linoleum that is several years old.
>
> My students worked on unmounted battleship linoleum
> and heated it slightly with a warm iron as they carved.
>
>> As far as printing goes, you really need to
>> "condition" your printing ink before attempting to
>> print with it.
>
>> You have to roll the ink until it
>> becomes "tacky", which you can discern by the look and
>> sound of the ink as you roll the brayer over it.
>> Experience will tell you what to look for, but the
>> texture of the ink looks even and the sound of the
>> brayer becomes louder as the ink dries slightly.
>
> Here is a link to my eight graders working on prints:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ColorPrinting.html
> Woody
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> =93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
> My newest watercolors:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: The art show...
> From: StacieMich@aol.com
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 22:14:45 EDT
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> I met with my students this afternoon to discuss the art show. So
> far, about
> seven students have signed up to help put it together. They came up
> with
> some good ideas so far: We are going to make trees, different themed
> trees, like
> a Picasso tree, a Frida Kahlo tree, a Van Gogh tree... From those
> trees, we
> will hang the work. Originally we were going to paint them on large
> butcher
> paper and then mount on the walls of the cafeteria, but then I got the
> idea to
> ask Home Depot if they would donate some thin wood. If so, I'm
> thinking
> about cutting the trees out of the wood and having the kids paint
> them. This way,
> they will be nice and sturdy and we could really hang things from
> them. I
> plan on asking Home Depot this week...we'll see.
>
> The kids want to dress up like servers and serve cheese and brownies.
> Ha!
> Since the theme of the show is kind of a multicultural theme, they
> talked about
> dressing up like different countries...but maybe they could each be an
> artist? This might be a bit much though...we need to consider time
> and money and
> what is truly doable.
>
> As for rewards, they want some type of judging...not sure how I feel
> about
> it. They suggested having ribbons for all entries but maybe having a
> "Most
> Creative" or categories like that. I don't know yet.
>
> I'm kind of excited because I think that it has the potential to be
> pretty
> cool. Next week the kids are meeting to make posters to get the word
> out. I'm
> still trying to think about selling tickets to raise money or having a
> raffle
> or auction...things like that. I think I'm going to hit the streets
> this
> weekend and ask around for donations...maybe a cheese platter from the
> local
> supermarket, maybe some construction paper from Wal-mart for mounting
> work, things
> like that. I don't have much experience asking for things...besides
> one
> fundraising event I did for cancer...so I'm a little nervous.
>
> Anyway, do I sound like I'm on the right track?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Stacie
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: questions about linocuts
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2006 23:10:48 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
>> Here are other printmaking lessons on my web site.
> Woody
> http://www.taospaint.com/NewPress.html
> http://www.taospaint.com/LessonCollographPrint.html
> http://www.taospaint.com/LessonSelfPortraitPrints.html
> Enjoy
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> =93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/DancePics/Triplets.html
> My newest watercolors:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> cdanthes@verizon.net
> leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu
>

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