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Re: Susan Folwell Breaks Tradition in Native American Pottery


From: Sidnie Miller (smiller_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Apr 30 2004 - 12:17:09 PDT

This isn't reddish brown though, it's a really rich dark color and has a
bit of a patina--I think they're burying it for a time and then exposing
it to air or something. It's a new technique. Sid

>>> 04/29/2004 3:16:13 PM >>>
The reddish brown color is the natural color the clay
turns if the pots are not smothered in the firing process.
The black occurs when the fire is totally smothered
with old ashes, dirt and dried horse manure. I don't
know the proper term to call this process.
                                        Woody in KC

Sidnie Miller wrote:
> I noticed that the new cool thing in Santa Fe was the brown pots
> are pit fired but not allowed to turn black--like Susan Folwell's
> stuff--she is only black at the edge. They are hand burnished
> certainly, but does anyone know how to get the brown color?? Sid
> ---

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