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Re: styro tips

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From: Bunki Kramer (bkramer_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Apr 04 2002 - 07:36:13 PST


from: Bunki Kramer (bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us)
Los Cerros Middle School
968 Blemer Road
Danville, CA 94526
art webpage - http://ww2.lcms.srvusd.k12.ca.us/faculty/faculty.html
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>From: "Foell, Marlyn@RHS" <FoellM@brevard.k12.fl.us>
>.... As an alternative, if they can use knives, the cheap-o serrated
> ones from the dollar store work well--
> You can easily join pieces with Elmer's and toothpicks. Put some glue on
> the ends of the toothpicks as well as along the styro surfaces. Push the
> toothpicks into the two pieces to be joined. > Marlyn Foell
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Those are exactly the techniques we use too....your basic serrated knife,
Elmer's and toothpicks. Once the glue dries, it's a solid connection. I've
tried the hot wire gizmo and it didn't work well for me. Just give me that
steak knife and a few toothpicks and I'm a happy camper.

There's also a serrated tool you can buy at the hardware store that looks
like a giant serrated knife on both sides, has a round wooden handle, and it
cuts large pieces REALLY well.

The toothpicks are nice because you can set up your sculpture with the
toothpicks and look at it from all angles and see what you will be getting
BEFORE you add the glue. Toodles.....Bunki

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