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conservation image
conservation image
conservation image
conservation image

On June 13, 1991, the GCI hosted the Board of Trustees of the J. Paul Getty Trust for a day of discussions dedicated to conservation issues. GCI Director Miguel Angel Corzo presented an overview of the Institute and its future directions, with staff updates of some of the Institute's major project areas, including earthquake mitigation studies in Europe and the U.S., archaeological conservation field projects in Bolivia, Cyprus, and the People's Republic of China, and Art and Archaeology Technical Abstracts and other GCI publications.

Following the meeting, the GCI held a reception in honor of Getty Trust President and Chief Executive Officer Harold M. Williams and other board members in attendance.

The Board of Trustees is the governing body of the J. Paul Getty Trust and its programs. The J. Paul Getty Trust was established in 1953 by Mr. J. Paul Getty as a charitable organization to support the J. Paul Getty Museum, located in Malibu, California. In 1982, the Trustees expanded the scope of programs to honor Mr. Getty's stated desire to support "the diffusion of artistic and general knowledge." With this commitment, the Getty Conservation Institute and other operating programs were established to address issues of global importance in the fields of the arts and humanities.

 

Miguel Angel Corzo Appointed Director of GCI

In January 1991, Miguel Angel Corzo became Director of the GCI, leaving his post as President and Chief Executive Officer of Friends of the Arts of Mexico Foundation. Mr. Corzo, well known to readers of this newsletter, served as a consultant and then as Director of Special Projects at the GCI from 1985 to 1988.

As president and CEO of Friends of the Arts of Mexico, Mr. Corzo organized Mexico: Splendors of Thirty Centuries, the most comprehensive exhibition of Mexican art presented in the United States to date. The exhibition, currently on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, was inaugurated in October 1990 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and then traveled to the San Antonio Museum in Texas. Under Mr. Corzo's leadership, the Foundation also exhibited the works of young, contemporary Mexican painters; organized a symposium on Mexican architecture; produced television documentaries on the art of Mexico; and spearheaded efforts to conserve the rock art of Baja California and the only surviving public mural in the U.S. by Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros, in collaboration with the GCI.

Born in Mexico City, Mr. Corzo received a Bachelor of Science from the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA). As a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard, he studied finance, energy, and political science. From 1974 to 1976, he was Dean of Academic Affairs at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana in Mexico City where he supervised the formation of a three-campus university. He has held several federal government posts in Mexico, including Under Secretary of State, Ministry of Tourism.

Mr. Corzo has served as a consultant to numerous museums, including the Museum of Black Civilizations in Senegal, Le Grand Louvre in Paris, and the Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Cairo. At the GCI, he was instrumental in developing the Institute's first special projects in conservation, including the wall paintings in the tomb of Nefertari, the royal mummies at the Cairo Museum, the Dead Sea Scrolls in Israel, the Yungang and Mogao grottoes in the People's Republic of China, and the GCI's international conference on in situ archaeological conservation in Mexico.

An active author, editor, and publisher, Mr. Corzo was awarded First Prize and Gold Medal for technical content at the 1980 Leipzig Book Fair for his Codex of Human Settlements. He is editor and publisher of El Templo Mayor, a book about the most important temple of the Aztecs, and Los Mayas: El Tiempo Capturado, a publication on Mayan civilization.

Mr. Corzo succeeds GCI founding Director Luis Monreal, who is presently Director General of La Caixa Foundation in Barcelona, Spain.