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Effective Preservation: From Reaction to Prevention
While many professions have become exceedingly narrow, preventive conservation has evolved to become one of the most interdisciplinary of fields. It uses knowledge from materials science, building science, chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, systems science, and management, as well as a host of technical fields. Decision making in this context can be exceedingly complex—which is why many in the profession are turning to risk management approaches that embrace uncertainty.

Sustainable Access: A Discussion about Implementing Preventive Conservation
Sarah Staniforth, Richard Kerschner, and Jonathan Ashley-Smith—three conservators who have devoted much time and thought to the application of preventive conservation—talk with the GCI's James Druzik and Jeffrey Levin about how the results of conservation research can be applied in a practical way.

Illuminating Alternatives: Research in Museum Lighting
One area where preservation risks can probably be more effectively managed is museum lighting. In 2002, new research on museum lighting helped prompt an experts meeting, organized by the GCI, that addressed questions involving the lighting of old master drawings. From that meeting's discussions, it was evident that there were a number of strategies that could improve the display lifetime of works of art on paper. The GCI is now pursuing a research program on the subject.

Climate Controls for Historic Buildings: A New Strategy
Many museums, libraries, and archives housed in hot and humid regions have sought to reduce the threat posed by biological infestation by controlling relative humidity through the use of air-conditioning systems. But use of these systems can result in other problems. For this reason, the GCI has been conducting research to identify and test alternative systems that are robust, sustainable, and simple to operate.

GCI News: Projects, Events, Publications and Staff

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