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Preserving the Legacy of 20th-Century Art
The art of the 20th century changed the way we look at the world—just as the art itself was affected by all the circumstances and disparities of our time. While art in traditional media is still being created, we now see art of mixed-media components, art of assemblage, and art that is ephemeral; even disposable and repeatable. An eminent curator and art historian examines the preservation challenge of much of 20th-century art and reports on the recent Getty Conservation Institute conference "Mortality Immortality? The Legacy of 20th-Century Art."

Seeing Things Age is a Form of Beauty: A Conversation with Ed Ruscha
The noted Los Angeles painter, printmaker, photographer, and filmmaker talks about artistic experimentation with materials and offers his thoughts on the longevity of art and the artist's role in preservation.

The Conservation of 20th-Century Art: Two Case Studies
In March 1998, leading figures in the contemporary art world gathered at the Getty Center in Los Angeles for the GCI conference "Mortality Immortality? The Legacy of 20th-Century Art." Two of the papers presented at the conference are excerpted here. Each paper explores a single work of art—one from the first half of the century, the other from the century's end. While their conservation problems are very different—as is the artistic intent in each case—both works are memorials and thus very much about mortality and immortality.

Canvas of the Millennia
As we grapple with preserving art from our own time, produced often with ephemeral materials, the challenge remains of preserving humanity's oldest art, made often with the most enduring of materials. Vast numbers of rock art sites have survived in the Americas, Australia, Africa, Europe, and Asia—evidence of the human urge to create that runs as an unbroken strand back into prehistory. With a recent exhibition and a conservation workshop, the GCI continues its efforts to preserve this notable—though sometimes overlooked —part of the world's cultural heritage.

GCI News: Projects, Events, and Publications
Updates on Getty Conservation Institute projects, events, courses, publications, and staff. Also, a tribute to conservator and teacher Paolo Mora.

The GCI Newsletter Staff Box