Museum Lighting Research
 
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A theoretical 3-band light filter compared to a continuous spectra blackbody source.

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GCI scientist Jim Druzik holding one of several filters being evaluated for use in museum lighting as part of the Institute's Museum Lighting project. Photo: Jessica Robinson, Getty Trust Communications.

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Vincent Beltran examining the benefits of anoxia for light-sensitive materials during assembly and early testing of display cases. Photo: Jim Druzik.

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Pigments and dyes after the second anoxic experiment. The group on the left was exposed in air and the right group in nitrogen. Most changes are difficult to see in photographs but a comparison of the two top blue wool cards is typical. The bottom blue wool cards were protected with aluminum. Photo: Jim Druzik.

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Display cases used in the anoxic experiment. The complexity of this experimental apparatus follows from the fact that such a high heat flux to the interior of the case, caused by accelerated light aging requirements, needs additional cooling and extensive monitoring to insure that other internal environmental conditions such as relative humidity are held at near ambient levels. Photo: Jim Druzik.

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Volunteers assisting in the evaluation of new light sources for the Museum Lighting Research Project are tested for color blindness prior to beginning their evaluation of the lighting. Photo: Jim Druzik.

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A volunteer evaluates perceived color differences in illuminants along green-red, blue-yellow, and brightness scales in the specially constructed experimental lighting facility at the Getty Center. Photo: Jim Druzik.

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Georgia O'Keeffe, Oriental Poppies, 1927, oil on canvas. Dale Kronkright, Conservator, Georgia OKeeffe Museum (left) and Carl Dirk from UTEP (right) examine the painting Oriental Poppies at the O'Keeffe Museum, on loan to the museum from the Fredrick R. Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Photo: Jim Druzik.

box of pastels
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A selection of pastels from Georgia O'Keeffe's workbox, including commercially available pastels (top), and pastels made by the artist (bottom). Photo: Jim Druzik, reproduced with permission of the Georgia OKeeffe Museum.

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Probe of microfader positioned over a section of a watercolor by Georgia O'Keeffe. Photo: Dennis Keeley

microfading assessments in the lab
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Jim Druzik, a GCI senior scientist, and Dale Kronkright, head of conservation at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, carrying out microfading assessments of eleven Georgia O'Keeffe watercolors in November 2008. Photo: Dennis Keeley

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Probe of microfader positioned over a section of a watercolor by Georgia O'Keeffe. Red, orange, and yellow areas are particularly sensitive to light. Photo: Dennis Keeley

feathers under ultraviolet illumination
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Feathers of a great horned owl (Bubo Virginianus). Under ultraviolet illumination, porphyrins—pigments found primarily in new feathers—show up as intense pink. Photo: Renee Riedler