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Ginori Porcelain Factory  

active: 1735 - present
porcelain manufactory
Italian

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One of the most important porcelain factories to be established in Italy, the Ginori porcelain manufactory was founded in Doccia, near Florence, by the Marchese Carlo Ginori in 1735. Ginori hired two Viennese painters, as well as an Italian modeler, Gaspero Bruschi, to start production. For ten years, Ginori experimented with different porcelain recipes and collected models and molds for porcelain figures. Finally, in 1746, he began to sell the factory's products to the public. The early works were made from a grayish, hard-paste porcelain derived from local clay, which was extremely prone to cracking. After 1770 the paste was changed to a finer, whiter variety.

Under the directorship of Ginori's son, Lorenzo, the Ginori factory produced a range of polychromed and white bas-reliefs of mythological subjects. The single figures and figure groups included peasant, classical, and commedia dell'arte subjects.

Ginori's was the only Italian porcelain factory to thrive during the 1800s; the factory continues production today under the name Richard-Ginori.


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Mercury & Perseus / Ginori
Mercury & Perseus

Italian, 1749