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    Roman Mosaics across the Empire

    March 30, 2016–January 1, 2018

    Getty Villa

    Corner panel from Bear Hunt (detail)

    Corner panel from Bear Hunt (detail), A.D. 300-400, Baiae, Italy, stone. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • Left panel from Pair of Peacocks

    Left panel from Pair of Peacocks, A.D. 400-600, possibly Emesa, Syria, stone. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of William Wahler

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    Bear Hunt

    Bear Hunt, A.D. 300-400, Baiae, Italy, stone. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • Bear Hunt (detail)

    Bear Hunt (detail), A.D. 300-400, Baiae, Italy, stone. The J. Paul Getty Museum

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    Hare and Birds with Geometric Designs (detail)

    Hare and Birds with Geometric Designs (detail), about A.D. 400, Antioch (now Turkey), stone. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • Diana and Callisto Surrounded by a Hunt (detail)

    Diana and Callisto Surrounded by a Hunt (detail), A.D. 175-200, Villelaure, France, stone and glass. Courtesy of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Phil Berg Collection (M.71.73.9)

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    Lion Attacking an Onager

    Lion Attacking an Onager, A.D. 150-200, Hadrumetum, (now Tunisia), stone and glass. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • Port Scene (detail)

    Port Scene (detail), A.D. 1-300, North Africa, stone and glass. Courtesy of the Ferrell Collection

  • Corner panel from Bear Hunt

    Corner panel from Bear Hunt, A.D. 300-400, Baiae, Italy, stone. The J. Paul Getty Museum

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    Orpheus and the Animals

    Orpheus and the Animals, A.D. 150-200, Saint-Romain-en-Gal, France, stone and glass. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • Port Scene

    Port Scene, A.D. 1-300, North Africa, stone and glass. Courtesy of the Ferrell Collection

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    Combat Between Dares and Entellus

    Combat Between Dares and Entellus, A.D. 175-200, Villelaure, France, stone and glass. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • Subterranean room in the House of Amphitrite, Bulla Regia, Tunisia

    Subterranean room in the House of Amphitrite, Bulla Regia, Tunisia. Courtesy of the Getty Conservation Institute. Photo by Scott S. Warren

Roman Mosaics across the Empire

March 30, 2016–January 1, 2018, Getty Villa

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In ancient times, mosaics decorated luxurious homes and public buildings across the Roman Empire. Intricate patterns and figural scenes were created by setting small pieces of stone or glass, called tesserae, into floors and walls. Introduced by itinerant craftsmen, mosaic techniques and designs spread widely, leading to variety of regional styles. The mosaics in this exhibition date from the 2nd through the 6th centuries A.D., and come from far-flung places: Italy, North Africa, Southern France, Turkey, and Syria. Recovered from various archeological contexts, they provide a glimpse into the richly embellished architecture of the ancient world.

RELATED EVENTS

LECTURES
Samson in Stone: New Discoveries in the Ancient Synagogue at Huqoq in Israel's Galilee

Excavations in the ancient village of Huqoq in Israel's Galilee have brought to light the remains of a monumental 5th-century Roman synagogue paved with stunning and unique mosaics, including depictions of the biblical hero Samson. In this illustrated presentation, excavation director Jodi Magness describes these exciting finds, including new discoveries made last summer. Event is free, but ticket required.
Sunday, April 3, 3:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Auditorium

Roman Mosaics: Evolution, Imagery, and Regional Characteristics

Mosaics first appear in the Greek world during the Hellenistic Age, yet it was under the Romans that they became ubiquitous across the Mediterranean world and beyond. Archaeologist Demetrios Michaelides examines the development of mosaics as an art form, its spread throughout the Roman Empire, and its contribution to our understanding of the ancient world. Event is free, but ticket required.
Thursday, June 16, 7:30 p.m.
Getty Villa, Auditorium

HANDLING SESSION

How were mosaics created from pieces of stone and glass? Learn how these intricate architectural decorations were made in this multisensory handling session. Touch tools and materials similar to those used by ancient mosaicists, including tesserae, slaked lime, marble dust, and nippers. This is a free, drop-in program.
Thursdays and Fridays, March 31 through September 9; 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Reading Room

CULINARY WORKSHOP
Across the Roman Empire

Join educator and chef Nancy DeLucia Real for a culinary exploration of the ancient Roman provinces. Tour the exhibition Roman Mosaics Across the Empire, then prepare a class meal inspired by historic ingredients from ancient Syria, Tunisia (Carthage), France (Gaul), and Rome. Course fee $95. Complimentary parking. Tickets available beginning April 11.
Thursday and Friday, May 12 and 13; 10:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
Getty Villa

TOURS
Curator’s Gallery Tours

The curator of the exhibition Roman Mosaics across the Empire leads a one-hour tour of elaborate mosaic floors from Italy and its provinces in Gaul, North Africa, and ancient Syria. Sign-up begins 15 minutes before the talk at the Tour Meeting Place.
Thursdays, April 28, May 19, June 2; 2:00 p.m.

MOBILE TOUR

Free GettyGuide® Multimedia Player

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From subjects of myth, literature, and daily life to archeological find-spots, experts tell stories about a selection of mosaics on view.
Pick up a multimedia player free of charge in the Museum Atrium.

VIDEO



Bulla Regia: A Model Conservation Project
Famed for its underground villas and mosaic floors, Bulla Regia is the site of an ancient Roman city located in Tunisia. The Getty Conservation Institute heads a model conservation project there, demonstrating best practices in the conservation of in situ mosaics.

PUBLICATION

Exhibition Checklist

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