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    Remembering Antiquity: The Ancient World through Medieval Eyes

    January 24–May 28, 2017

    Getty Center

    <em>Skylla and Sirens</em>, from <em>Mirror of History</em> (text in French), Ghent, about 1475, tempera colors, gold leaf, and gold paint on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    Skylla and Sirens, from Mirror of History (text in French), Ghent, about 1475, tempera colors, gold leaf, and gold paint on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • <em>Fresco with Victory</em>, Roman, AD 50-79, plaster and pigment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    Fresco with Victory, Roman, AD 50-79, plaster and pigment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • <em>Earrings with Nike</em>, Greek, about 225-175 BC, gold and glass. The J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman

    Earrings with Nike, Greek, about 225-175 BC, gold and glass. The J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman

  • <em>The Angel Slaying the Assyrians and the Death of Sennacherib</em>, leaf from a book of Old Testament prophets, Sicily, about 1300, tempera colors and gold on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    The Angel Slaying the Assyrians and the Death of Sennacherib, leaf from a book of Old Testament prophets, Sicily, about 1300, tempera colors and gold on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • <em>Coin with Alexander the Great with the Horn of Zeus Ammon</em>, Greek, minted at Pella, 286-281 BC, silver. The J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Lily Tomlin

    Coin with Alexander the Great with the Horn of Zeus Ammon, Greek, minted at Pella, 286-281 BC, silver. The J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Lily Tomlin

  • <em>Initial P: Alexander the Great Carried Aloft by Griffins<em> (detail), from <em>Historia Scholastica</em>, Austria, about 1300, tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    Initial P: Alexander the Great Carried Aloft by Griffins (detail), from Historia Scholastica, Austria, about 1300, tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • <em>The Flight into Egypt</em>, from <em>Prayer Book of Cardinal Albrecht of Brandenburg</em>, about 1525-30, Simon Bening, tempera colors, gold paint, and gold leaf on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    The Flight into Egypt, from Prayer Book of Cardinal Albrecht of Brandenburg, about 1525-30, Simon Bening, tempera colors, gold paint, and gold leaf on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • <em>Statuette of Jupiter</em>, Roman, AD 1-100, silver. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    Statuette of Jupiter, Roman, AD 1-100, silver. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • <em>Initial A: King David</em> (detail), from a missal, about 1520, Matteo da Milano, tempera and gold on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    Initial A: King David (detail), from a missal, about 1520, Matteo da Milano, tempera and gold on parchment. The J. Paul Getty Museum

  • <em>Cameo with Hermaphroditos</em>, Greek, 150-100 BC, attributed to Protarchos, sardonyx set in a modern gold ring. The J. Paul Getty Museum

    Cameo with Hermaphroditos, Greek, 150-100 BC, attributed to Protarchos, sardonyx set in a modern gold ring. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Remembering Antiquity: The Ancient World through Medieval Eyes

January 24–May 28, 2017, Getty Center

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In a rare juxtaposition of antiquities from the Getty Villa and manuscripts from the Museum’s collection, this exhibition explores medieval responses to the ancient world. For more than a thousand years following the fall of Rome (476 A.D.), classical culture lived on in European literature and art. Medieval scribes translated and preserved classical texts, while artists adapted and embellished images of ancient rulers and mythical heroes for inclusion in Christian manuscripts. Although the “rediscovery” of Greek and Roman culture is often associated with the Renaissance, antiquity was never forgotten.

RELATED EVENT

TALK
Antique and Pseudo-Antique in Carolingian Manuscripts

In the 9th-century Carolingian Empire, scribes and artists played a leading role in the preservation and interpretation of ancient culture. Lawrence Nees, professor of art history at the University of Delaware, explains how the creators of Carolingian manuscripts utilized and adapted older sources, but also created new works in an antique manner.

Thursday, May 4, 7:00 p.m.
Getty Center, Museum Lecture Hall

MOBILE TOUR

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Greek gods in medieval manuscripts? Join curators Kristen Collins, Kenneth Lapatin and Rheagan Martin to discover how antiquity was kept alive during the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Pick up a multimedia player free of charge in the Museum Entrance Hall.

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