The J. Paul Getty Museum

Torso of a Hunter

Object Details

Title:

Torso of a Hunter

Artist/Maker:

Unknown

Culture:

Roman

Place:

Italy (Place Created)

Date:

1st–2nd century A.D.

Medium:

Marble

Object Number:

72.AA.110

Dimensions:

65 × 58 × 33.5 cm (25 9/16 × 22 13/16 × 13 3/16 in.)

See more

See less

Object Description

Only the torso and part of one arm of this Roman statue survive, but they provide clues to the sculpture's original appearance. The firm, well-muscled torso indicates that the statue represented a young man. A chlamys, or short cloak, is fastened around his neck, then pulled to one side, and wrapped around his extended right arm. This combination of nudity and a short cloak suggests that the statue represents a hero or mythological figure. Furthermore, the torsion in the abdominal muscles point to a twisting and violent motion in the figure's pose. Similar representations survive of the young man Actaeon, who had the misfortune of seeing Diana, the virgin goddess of the hunt, naked. She punished Actaeon by transforming him into a stag and setting his own hunting dogs on him. This statue may have depicted Actaeon, still in human form, whirling around to defend himself as his dogs attack.

Provenance
Provenance
- 1972

Antiken Heinz Herzer (Munich, Germany), sold to the J. Paul Getty Museum, 1972.

Bibliography
Bibliography

Antiken H. Herzer & Co. advertisement. Apollo 95 (March, 1972), p. 77, ill.

Vermeule, Cornelius C. Greek and Roman Sculpture in America (Berkeley and London: University of California Press, 1981), no. 123.

Herrmann, Jr. J.J. "Exportation of Dolomitic Marble from Thasos: Evidence from European and North American Collections." In Ancient Stones: Quarrying, Trade and Provenance. Marc Waelkens et al., eds. (Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1992), p. 94.

Grossman, Janet Burnett. Looking at Greek and Roman Sculpture in Stone (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2003), pp. 108, ill.