Seated Woman

Object Details

Title:

Seated Woman

Artist/Maker(s):

Henry Moore (British, 1898 - 1986)

Culture:

British

Date:

designed 1958 - 1959; cast 1975

Medium:

Bronze

Dimensions:

203.2 x 96.5 x 129.5 cm, 581.5114 kg (80 x 38 x 51 in., 1282 lb.)

Copyright:

© 2012 The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved. / ARS, New York / DACS, London

Credit Line:

Gift of Fran and Ray Stark

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Although willfully distorted, this large bronze form remains instantly identifiable as a seated woman. The figure's lower half has been reduced to a bulbous mass that rests atop a minimally articulated stool. The top half is more contorted, yet plainly recognizable as a female torso. The woman's head turns distractedly to one side and, though lacking in anatomical specificity, achieves a surprising degree of expression.

The creation of this sculpture reveals the lengthy gestation period that sometimes accompanied Henry Moore's work. In the late 1950s, he made a maquette or small plaster model of this seated figure. Once he had achieved the desired shape, one of Moore's studio assistants then carved a plaster mold of the maquette to be sent to a foundry for casting in bronze. But Moore, unsatisfied with the large mold, chose not to have it cast and continued to refine the plaster. It remained in his studio for many years and was finally cast in 1975–more than two decades after the original design was conceived.

Provenance
- 1985

The Raymond Spencer Company, Ltd. (Hertfordshire, England), sold to Fran and Ray Stark, February 13, 1985.

1985 - 1992

Fran Stark

and Ray Stark, upon the death of Fran Stark, retained by her husband, Ray Stark, 1992.

1992 - 2004

Ray Stark, upon his death, distributed to the Ray Stark Revocable Trust.

2004 - 2005

The Ray Stark Revocable Trust, donated to the J. Paul Getty Museum.

Bibliography

Bowness, Alan and David Sylvester, editors. Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture. 6 vols. (London: Lund Humphries, 1977-1988).

Boström, Antonia, ed. The Fran and Ray Stark Collection of 20th-Century Sculpture at the J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2008), pp. 126-29, no. 20, entry by Christopher Bedford.